SED Opportunity Digest – 5 November 2021

Welcome to our digest full of interesting events, opportunities and schemes that may help you meet collaborators, improve their career prospects or simply broaden your horizons.

Please let us know if you have any suggestions for next edition via sed-web@qmul.ac.uk

From QMUL, Partners & Friends

Pop Up Creative Skills Academy in Reading Week

Diaspora Speaks x Peach Creative Writing Event

Diaspora Speaks × Peach Magazine Creative Writing Workshop
16 November 2021 | 6-8 pm | St Benet’s Chaplaincy – QMUL Mile End

An amazing creative writing workshop is around the corner. A Diaspora Speaks x Peach Magazine collab. All welcome.

Sign up here


Freedom and Independence Theatre Festival – From 5 November

For many years, Tower Hamlets Council and Queen Mary University of London have been proud to support A Season of Bangla Drama, an annual festival which brings the borough’s communities together each November to celebrate the magic of theatre as well as the arts and cultural traditions of Bangladesh.

As we mark the 50th anniversary of the Independence of Bangladesh, this has been renamed the Freedom and Independence Theatre Festival.

The themes in the title have inspired the plays and events that make up this year’s programme. We are delighted that we are continuing to profile British Bangladeshi theatre as an important way to spotlight key events of 1971, tell untold stories, and reach out to new audiences.

The variety of plays on offer cover topics including the plight of women, the tales of freedom fighters, the journeys of refugees such as the Rohingya and Vietnamese, as well as the power of protest. 

There will be a fringe programme of events including a Bengali heritage walk, film screenings, an international youth writing project, talks and exhibitions.

The festival will also provide opportunities for audiences to participate through Q&As, and to be immersed in the richness of poetry, music and dance.

This is a fantastic way to learn about the history, legacy and impact of what unfolded half a century ago.

For the full programme listings, please visit our What’s On page.

The Unbreakable Student: 6 Rules for Staying Sane at University

To celebrate the publishing of his new book The Unbreakable Student: 6 Rules for Staying Sane at University Nic will be sharing some of his best hints and tips with our student ambassadors before giving you the chance to ask your own questions. The free live event will be happening on Wednesday 10th November at 2pm.

To book your free space follow this link

Outside QMUL

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BBC Academy: Production Unlocked

Are you interested in getting into the field of factual television production? #ProductionUnlocked has a day packed with all the tips and tricks you need to create great factual content

Click the link to secure your place! https://bbc.co.uk/academy/events/production-unlocked

Build your speaking confidence for free with top employers like Just Eat, Investec and Google


Sign up now for the award-winning We Speak Employment online programme. Improve your speaking confidence and employment opportunities with mentors from companies including Just Eat, Investec and Google.

Your place would be fully funded by our corporate partners. During live weekly online sessions, you’ll build your confidence around how to contribute to discussions, speak comfortably at job interviews and speak in front of groups.

The programme take place once a week over 4 weeks. You can choose from dates starting in mid November. Participants will receive a Certificate of Achievement. It’s a friendly and relaxed environment so perfect if you feel less confident speaking.

Sign up as soon as possible at www.wespeak.co/apply (2 minute form). The opportunity closes on Monday 8 November but places may run out earlier.

Decadent Plays A one-night-only rehearsed reading of ‘decadent’ plays

Rehearsed readings at The Albany, Deptford, Wednesday 10th November 2021

Book a free ticket

While commonly associated with hedonism and excess, the word ‘decadence’ has a much richer set of connotations, including a taste for decay, delight in uncommon sexual and cultural practices, and the upturning of moral hierarchies. For this event, we’ve selected some of the most innovative scenes from Remy de Gourmont’s Lilith (1892), in a new translation by Dan Rebellato; the first act of Jean Lorrain’s Ennoïa (1905), translated into English for the first time by Jennifer Higgins; Djuna Barnes’s brilliant one-act play The Dove (1923); and a little-known text that was well ahead of its time by Izumi Kyōka called Kerria Japonica (1923). The curators and translators will also be offering short introductions to each of the performed texts.  

Expect an unusual and expansive evening filled with femme fatales, sadomasochistic pleasures, queer desires, and the fall of humankind.  

Curated by Dr Adam Alston and Professor Jane Desmarais | Directed by Jonathan Meth | Performers: Lauren John Joseph, Georgia Sansom, Sadao Ueda, Yuriri Naka, Eric Stroud and Adam Alston.

The ‘Go For It’ High Street Enterprise Start-up Support Programme will help you:

– Develop your enterprise idea

– Work out what you need to start and grow a high street business.

– Develop your entrepreneurial skills 

– Plan market research

– Develop a marketing & sales plan

– Prepare a budget

– Learn about customer service and 

– Manage cash flow and finance

Apply here

Creativity and Climate Justice: OPEN SPACE EVENT

Discussing how creativity and arts can engage with climate change and action

Women in the Arts Festival – Rich Mix

From Fri 5 – Fri 12 Nov Sama Arts Network will bring us concerts, talks and panel discussions – all focused on women in music and the arts.

  • Further sources of interesting events, opportunities and jobs are…

Apples & Snakes Artists Newsletter | Arts Admin E-Digest | ArtsJobs | BBC Academy | Creative Access (Jobs) | JournoResources | Lectures.London | MediaBeans (media jobs) | QMUL Careers | Presspad | Tower Hamlets Arts | Write at Home (freelance writing opps)

English and Drama Newsletter – November 2021 Edition

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Join 6,064 other subscribers.

Welcome to November in the School of English and Drama at Queen Mary University of London.

Rediscover Feminism

REDISCOVER: FEMINISM: We are hosting an exciting free study day event for year 12 students to take a fresh look at feminism to help with their studies.
Year 12 students and teachers can sign up early here

OFFER HOLDER DAYS: We will be hosting offer holder days for applicants who apply and get an offer from us.
Ask a question about your offer or applying

INSTAGRAM LIVE Q&A: Every Thursday at around 2pm we host a live Instagram Q&A. So far we have had a ball with Karina Lickorish Quinn, Michael Craske (and honey his pug!), Isabel Waidner and Martin Welton. Want to take part? Email us or DM on Instagram.

TIKTOK: We’re excited to launch our new social channel which we hope to give a platform to many students voices in the coming months.

Follow us on TikTok

Events

OPEN DAYS

3 ways to connect with us until our new events are announced…

1. Watch our recent events on demand:

Undergraduate Open Event

MA English Literature Event

MA Theatre and Performance Event

2. Book a 1-2-1 with Rupert to discuss the course you’re interested in.

3. Read our 21 Reasons to Apply before the UCAS Deadline

FREEDOM & INDEPENDENCE THEATRE FESTIVAL


The Freedom & Independence Theatre Festival runs from 5-28 November 2021 and will comprise an intercultural programme marking the 50th anniversary of Bangladeshi independence. Activities will include 12 theatrical performances, exhibitions, curated talks and seminars. Queen Mary is a proud partner and one of the highlights on campus is:

Freedom and Independence: People Speak by British Bangladeshi Poetry Collective

A (bilingual) poetry-play event where audience members are invited to join BBPC poets on stage.

Get some highlights in our blog post
See the full programme


BEYOND HUMAN FESTIVAL

Projected Books

‘Projected Books for Veterans of the Second World War’
13 November 2021 | 2-4pm | Royal Hospital Chelsea

Join historian Matthew Rubery for a live demonstration of an invention from the Second World War that projected books onto the ceiling.

Book here

Stepney Words

Stepney Words Fifty Years On
14 November 2021 | People’s Palace, QMUL Mile End

The remarkable story of 1971’s Stepney Words, with Chris Searle, Stepney Words poets, historians, activists and today’s young voices.

Book here

The Laboratory of Psychical Research
13-16 November | 4.30pm | Senate House
 The wooden panelled Court Room at Senate House will play host to a reimagining of the historic National Laboratory of Psychical Research 1925-1930 by the celebrated paranormal investigator Harry Price.

Book here
See more events from Queen Mary in our New Perspectives Series at Being Human

LISTINGS

Anna Harpin on ‘Being a Mess: Performance and The Tender Loneliness of Kim Noble’s You’re Not Alone’
9 November
In the second paper in the Solitudes project 2021/22 seminar series, Anna Harpin from the University of Warwick examines ‘being a mess’ as not only personal catastrophe but political, public event. Follow Pathologies of Solitude on Instagram

Film London Jarman Award Weekend 2021
14 November | Whitechapel Gallery Online

Nisha Ramayya (English/Creative Writing) will be reading poetry alongside a talk by Adham Faramwy one of the six artists shortlisted for the 2021 Film London Jarman Award. This weekend gives you the opportunity to view their films alongside a special live online programme that explores their different practices through talks and performances. 

SS Princess

Shane Boyle: “Waiting for Ships to Die”: Ever Given & Salvage Spectacles
Tuesday 16 November | Royal Central School of Speech and Drama
“This talk considers Ever Given within an extended history of salvage spectacles so as to consider the continuity of our logistical present with the empires of the past.”

Diaspora Speaks x Peach Creative Writing Event

Diaspora Speaks × Peach Magazine Creative Writing Workshop
16 November 2021 | 6-8 pm | St Benet’s Chaplaincy – QMUL Mile End
An amazing creative writing workshop is around the corner. A Diaspora Speaks x Peach Magazine collab. All welcome.
Sign up here

Living with Machines

Working With Machines
17 November | Online
‘Are we just feeding machines our own biases as we “train” up living machines?’ An online discussion of the Living With Machines project at the Alan Turing Institute. Prof. Ruth Ahnert is Principal Investigator on the flagship Turing project ‘Living With Machines’, and a Professor of Literary History and Digital Humanities at Queen Mary University of London.

Follow us on Twitter

News & Links

Alumni Angles Podcast featuring FAB Website Editor, Editorial Assistant at Faber & Faber, and the voice of the world’s first digital model, Ama Badu (English BA, 2018), is joined by Founder of The History Hotline podcast and Oral History and Project Officer at Wesley’s Chapel, Deanna Lyn Cook (English and History BA, 2018).

Watch here | Listen here

Cassils

Dominic Johnson (Drama) was commissioned to write an essay to accompany Cassils’s solo exhibition at HOME in Manchester. Read his essay and those of our friends here: Cassils – Who By Fire by Dominic JohnsonThe Statuesque in the Headlights by Jay BernardShowstopper by Libro Levi BridgemanCassils Cuts: A Traditional Sculpture: Time Lapse (Front), 2011 (detail) Courtesy of the artist

Madeleine Levy (English and Drama graduate 2011) Madeleine talks about her new book, When I Grow Up I Want to Be a Cat: Surviving the education system with Asperger’s, where she and others share their experiences of navigating the education system with autism. Madeleine also talks about why she started her own theatre company for people with autism and the important lessons she learned and shared during her time at university.

Read her alumni profile here

Sophie Burrows

Pathologies of Solitude Project Update

Artist-in-residence, the award-winning illustrator Sophie Burrows, has created a series of artworks in response to research stemming from our project. An online exhibition of her work, as well as sketchbooks and notes on the process, can be found here.

The Astronaut Alone In our latest blog, researcher Jeffrey Mathias writes about NASA’s isolation chamber, used to put astronauts to the test in the 1950s. Read the post

mediumship

kitt price (English) and Aleksander Kolkowski recreate the experience of ‘thinking-in’, when thousands of listeners engaged in radio telepathy experiments during the 1920s and 30s on Resonance FM. Listen here

Nisha Ramayya (English/Creative Writing) and Akshi Singh Wellcome-funded project on experiences of solitude in relation to race and migration. his project is part of the bigger Pathologies of Solitude project led by Barbara Taylor. With poet Rachel Long and coordinator Tasha Pick, the team has organised a series of creative writing workshops in association with Hackney Migrant Centre and Praxis, featuring inspiring sessions on names, spaces for sleeping, and collective processes of recollection & documentation.

Nisha will also be performing as part of an encounter between poetry and music Treble Heaven at Café Oto on 30 November with sonic dramaturg MJ Harding. Find out more

Durga Puja

Morag Shiach (English/Director, Network: QMUL Centre for the Creative and Cultural Economy) has published a key report with the British Council on Mapping the Creative Economy around the Durga Puja.

Read more

Follow us on Instagram for the latest

Whilst we try our hardest to make sure listings are accurate, we recommend contacting the event organiser or registering before attending any events.

Mistakes and omissions can be made with this volume of information and we apologise for these.

If you have any news or events for our final newsletter in 2021 please reply to this email.

Warm regards

Rupert

Rupert Dannreuther
Marketing Manager

School of English and Drama
Queen Mary University of London

Twitter | Instagram | Youtube
sed-web@qmul.ac.uk

Queen Mary is proud to partner on Freedom & Independence Theatre Festival 2021 starting on 5 November

The Freedom & Independence Theatre Festival runs from 5-28 November 2021 and will comprise an intercultural programme marking the 50th anniversary of Bangladeshi independence. Activities will include 12 theatrical performances, exhibitions, curated talks and seminars.

It will facilitate a dynamic cultural exchange between youth, elders and marginalised groups across the UK Bangladeshi, Palestinian, Rohingya, Somali, Vietnamese and London’s East End communities, celebrating in diverse modes and media the themes of freedom and independence.

Queen Mary University of London has been a key partner on the festival since its inception with events happening on campus in our ArtsOne Building.

Some highlights include:

Freedom and Independence: People Speak by British Bangladeshi Poetry Collective A (bilingual) poetry-play event where audience members are invited to join BBPC poets on stage

Bengali History Walk by Swadhinata Trust A poet will be joining this year’s Banglatown walk to add a new dimension to this engaging, interactive slice of local history

Film: ‘A Very British History: British-Bangladeshis’ The film explores the migration history and experiences of the British Bangladeshi community

Future 001 Xuriyo by Numbi Arts Future 001 Xuriyo is an Afro-Futurist project that tries to imagine the possibilities of a Somali future

Use Your Words by Arts Without Borders Come along and hear how young writers have got creative and honed their craft using the themes of independence and freedom

Ummsiyah by Arts Without Borders This is a celebration of Palestinian arts and culture as well as the lived Palestinian experience

Sunday is Saree Day by Mohila Ongon This is a female only event to celebrate womanhood through sarees, heritage and Bangladeshi delicacies

When Madonna was Dying by BSK This play tells the story of the women activists in 1971 in the UK who were the forerunners in raising voices for freedom

London Performance Now: Athena at The Yard Theatre 2021 by Ana Rosales – Review

Athena | The Yard Theatre

I’d been wary, coming in. Of course, visiting a new place alone is almost inevitably nerve-racking, and this is certainly the case during my visit to The Yard Theatre, where I’m set to watch Athena, a story by American playwright Gracie Gardner. But there’s more to my hesitancy than the simple novelty of The Yard, for all its gentrified millennial aesthetics. 

As an American student in the UK, I was curious to see British theatre-makers handle the Americanisms embedded in Athena’s text. Upon arrival I wasn’t sure what to make of the company, but I’m happy to report this production has successfully snuck into my heart. 

Starring Millicent Wong as titular Athena and Grace Saif as friendly rival Mary Wallace, the show pushes audiences right into the deep end of American teenage girlhood, with the added edge of high school sports—in this case, fencing.  

The story unfolds mostly through the girls’ training sessions, and while they seem to have little in common outside the sport, Athena and Mary Wallace manage to build a steady rhythm toward friendship. Featuring the most realistic teenage girl dialogue I’ve heard in a long time—brava to Wong and Saif’s delivery, and special compliments to voice coach Rachel Coffey for honing some impressive American accents from the performers—it became easy to lose myself in the show’s pleasant authenticity. 

The production’s staging is effective, for all its no-frills dramaturgical choices. Taking place on a mostly bare stage, our only clue to any concrete environment is a long blue rectangle painted diagonally through the stage floor—the piste, fencing strip—and most scene changes are signaled with lighting cues. The choreography is thrilling to watch, too. Fight director Claire Llewellyn does a brilliant job molding the physicality of fencing into rich and meaningful movement that is reflective of the characters. 

The play culminates in an epic, real-time fencing match between the two girls, a wordless 12-minute face-off. But this grand finale is quiet—eerily so. With no dialogue (save for an occasional disembodied ‘en garde!’), all we hear are the shuffling of feet and the clanking of sabres. Part of me wishes there had been something to underscore this: music, or maybe muted cheers from spectators. But on the other hand, the quiet makes for a thoroughly tense experience. It’s a deliberate risk, but one I’m still not sure is entirely worth it. 

Athena also tentatively approaches themes of class. Although this is not explored much further than mentions of suburban morning routines and the woes of commuting, I find the subtle scratching of these topics a poignant reflection of adolescence itself—at this age, you’re wary of showing off those most vulnerable parts of yourself, including the intricacies of class. For two young fencers, letting your “garde” down is the bravest thing you can do. 

If you’re the kind of theatregoer who finds value in the mundane, and value in even the most ephemeral relationships, watch Athena. It really is a gem. 

Read more about London Performance Now module

SED Opportunity Digest – 22 October 2021

Welcome to our digest full of interesting events, opportunities and schemes that may help you meet collaborators, improve their career prospects or simply broaden your horizons.

Please let us know if you have any suggestions for next edition via sed-web@qmul.ac.uk

From QMUL, Partners & Friends

New Black History Month alumni profile – Tomiwa Owolade (English BA, 2018)

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I’m excited to share my latest profile for Black History Month, featuring freelance writer and critic, Tomiwa Owolade (English BA, 2018). (Thank you to Suzanne, who bumped into Tomiwa at a book signing recently and told me about him!)

In his profile, Tomiwa explores the idea of ‘pride’ and talks about how his degree helped to develop his skills as a writer, how lucky he feels to have a job that aligns so much with his interests, and why he’s been inspired to begin writing a book about black British identity. 

“[My book] is a critique of a tendency to conflate the experiences and cultures of the black British population with the black American population. Obviously, there are instances when comparisons are valid, but the assumption, which I found pervasive after the Black Lives Matter protests last year, that we can analyse black Britain through an American lens, is reductive.”

For the full interview, visit: https://bit.ly/TomiwaOwolade.

Please like and share the social media posts if you can:

Twitter / Instagram / LinkedIn / Facebook.

Craft Podcast

Calling all lovers of reading and literature! Join Wasafiri’s Malachi McIntosh and your favourite international writers including Daniel Mella, Chen Chen, Bernadine Evaristo, and Raymond Antrobus to take you on a journey behind the scenes and unpack the often-hidden side of how their work was created.

New Learning Resources

  • Digital Theatre + (digital recordings of theatre productions).  This is in addition to Drama Online (digital recordings of theatre productions and play scripts), which we started subscribing to last year.
  • Oxford Research Encyclopaedia of Literature (dynamically updated key reference work on literature)
  • Alexander Street Academic Video Online (documentaries and films across all subject areas)

Read more here

Diversity QMUL Diversity Speaks Coaching

We have the opportunity for you to engage with some specialist mentoring.

Unlock your Talent, build confidence and tackle any difficulties you are facing whilst being at university and identifying from a Black Asian and Minority Ethnic Background.

If you are interested please sign up here or via the QR code in the email.

Outside QMUL

A Free Inclusive Festival of Theatre, Dance and Cabaret

White text in capital letters spell out the words 'A Bit Of A Do' the words are stacked on top of each other. From the words wavy lines in blue, pink and purple move diagonally across the image. In the background there is a picture of a disco ball that is reflecting blue, purple and pink lights.

18th – 28th November 2021 At Stanley Arts & Online A Bit Of A Do, our annual festival of theatre, dance and cabaret, featuring work by disabled and non-disabled artists is back!  Everyone is invited! We will be returning to Stanley Arts – a community arts venue in South Norwood, from the 18th to 28th of November. This year there will be two ways to experience the festival: this can be in person or online, so you can choose which you prefer. All events include British Sign Language interpretation and some events include enhanced access for visually impaired audiences. We have a range of amazing performances and digital experiences including work from Bert & Nasi, Forced Entertainment, Moxie Brawl, GymJam, Ellen Renton, Jack Dean & Company and Aby Watson. As well as an evening of Cabaret Performance, an inclusive club night and a Scratch Night that will showcase brand new performance ideas from disabled artists. As always all events are Free to attend – you just need to book a ticket so that we know how many people will be with us! You can find all of the festival information and book tickets by following the link below. We can’t wait to have ‘A Bit Of A Do’ with You! Learn More

Friday Late: remake with gal-dem

Friday Late takeover, this month gal-dem and friends are back for a night of live performances, workshops, installations, talks and screenings.   As we enter the Roaring Twenties, this Friday Late, we’re asking you to remake with us, using your hands, minds and imagination to radically change the times we live in.   29 October, 18.30 – 22.00

FIND OUT MORE GO TO gal-dem

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Rough Trade Books presents an evening curated by Musa Okwonga at The Social

Featuring live readings from two of the UK’s most exciting literary voices, Inua Ellams and Nikesh Shukla, a long-overdue Social performance from the incredible 4 BROWN GIRLS WHO WRITE and finally, Musa himself in conversation with Ian Wright (can’t believe we’ve actually just written that…

We’ll also have music from DJ Pierre Nedd, and the usual array of Rough Trade Books merchandise for sale. So get down to the best bar in town for what promises to be a classic night.

Calling all avid readers! Enrich your CV with a portfolio of book reviews on our independent review site Reedsy Discovery.

We spotlights gems of the indie publishing world — great books that are often overshadowed by big bestsellers. As a reviewer, you can contribute as much or as little as you like, and great reviews will be featured in our newsletter, sent weekly to 300k readers.

What do you need to apply? At least 1-2 book review examples.

Interested students can apply here: https://reedsy.com/discovery/reviewers/apply?source=uni

If you have any further questions, you can drop me an email at victoria@reedsy.com and check out our FAQ here: https://reedsy.com/discovery/reviewers-faq

May be an image of text that says 'DID YOU KNOW ? That the average person now spends almost 10 hours a day online WE SPEND MORE TIME H ON THE And Learn INTERNET online THANWEDO SLEEPING! WebCrafters'

WebCrafters

WebCrafters is a student-led project aiming to enable students to access the hidden job market through the power of the personal website. Whether you are a student, a graduate, or looking to have a change of career, we are here to help you promote your personality and achievements in the best possible light. How? By teaching you to code your own personal portfolio website and showing you how to interface that site with LinkedIn and other key employability sites to maximise your online presence. These will enable you to gravitate towards the hidden job market and showcase yourself in the best possible light to prospective employers.

Computacenter roles are now open and they have some awesome opportunities for both placement years and graduate programs. 

What do Computacenter do? In simple terms, you’d be joining a company who delivers digital tech solutions to some of the biggest organisations in the world. They have opportunities across Business Management, Project Management, Technical Consultancy, and Sales.

Placement Years – £17k, Locations across the UK, Add real value from Day 1, Hands on experience and the opportunity to learn and work on innovative solutions for our customers.

Graduates – £30k starting salary, Locations across the UK, Structured support programme designed to fast track your learning and development in a business that really cares about it’s employees.

Interested? Follow the link below to their Future Careers page to find out more.

http://ocply.co/am-computacenter21

The Uni Bubble regarding our free weekly careers newsletters where we’re equipping students to move into industries of the future after university. We’ll be guiding you on the opportunities available to you, the free skills and qualifications you can gain to increase your employability and other specific advice on each industry weekly.

Our 7 industry-specific newsletters you can choose from are: Digital, Technology, Creative, Business, Green Jobs, Entrepreneurship and Exploring Opportunities.

It can be overwhelming navigating the career paths available to you so we’re here to guide and prepare you to find work in an industry you’re interested in, regardless of your degree background.

Find out more about us on our website or sign up now using this registration form – it’ll take 5 minutes and you won’t regret it!

Journeys: 150 Years of ImmigrationRoyal Albert Hall – 29 October – 6 November 2021 

Next week sees an all-new festival taking place at the Royal Albert Hall, celebrating 150 years of immigration via a series of inspiring talks, performances, and interactive events, featuring an array of artists, musicians and speakers from immigrant backgrounds.

Part of the Hall’s 150th anniversary programme, Journeys is curated by prolific musician, producer and broadcaster Nitin Sawhney, who will headline the festival with a concert in the main auditorium on Friday 29 October.

Nitin will also be on hand to lead panel discussions covering the relationship between diversity and creativity, and evaluating the meaning of being an immigrant in society today. He will be joined by such names as Andy Serkis, Sonita Gale and YolanDa Brown. Limited £5 tickets for these talks are available for students, under 26s and unemployed.

Find out more and book tickets at: royalalberthall.com/journeys.

Warburg Institute Director’s Seminar – a conversation with Rivka Galchen about her new novel, Everyone Knows your Mother is a Witch, with Ulinka Rublack

Wednesday 27 October 2021: 5.00-6.00pm UK time (BST)

Online via zoom

Rivka Galchen’s novel, published this summer, about the witchcraft trial of Katharina Kepler was described by the Wall Street Journal as “a very beautiful work of fiction” and the LA Times as “a smart book that investigates the power of narrative… while being funny and deceptively easy to read.” Galchen re-imagines the world of the Holy Roman Empire during the Thirty Years War, concentrating on the herbal remedies, troubled friendships, and worldly tribulations of the mother of the astronomer Johannes Kepler. To discuss the book and the case, as well as the challenges of rendering difficult histories in artistic forms, Galchen will be joined by Professor Ulinka Rublack of Cambridge University, whose book on the trial and its implications for the history of science and magic, the Reformation, and women’s lives, was an important source. Rublack also created an opera, Kepler’s Trial, on the subject.

Rivka Galchen is the author of the novel Atmospheric Disturbances, the short-story collection American Innovations, the essay Little Labors, and the children’s book Rat Rule 79. She is the recipient of numerous fellowships and awards and is a regular contributor of essays, reviews, and fiction to The London Review of Books, The New York Times Magazine, and The New Yorker. She lives in New York and Montreal and teaches in the writing program at Columbia University.

Ulinka Rublack, FBA, is a professor in early modern European history and a Fellow of St John’s College, Cambridge. She is editor of The Oxford Handbook of the Protestant Reformations; her other books include Dürer in the Age of Wonder and The Astronomer and the Witch: Johannes Kepler’s Fight for His Mother, which won the Deutsche Historikerpreis. Her current project, The Triumph of Fashion, charts the rise of fashion in different parts of the globe from 1300 onwards. During the academic year 2021-2 she is a Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg, Berlin.

Free to attend. All welcome. For booking see: https://warburg.sas.ac.uk/events/directors-galchen-rublack

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The Amplify Project – Black Writers In Their Own Words

Recently launched podcast series called The Amplify Project is committed to supporting Black British writers and amplifying the Black British literary cannon. We’ve invited writers for the stage, page and screen to tell us about themselves, their work, what inspires them and why they write.

You can find our website here which also has links to our social media handles.

Further sources of interesting events, opportunities and jobs are…

Apples & Snakes Artists Newsletter | Arts Admin E-Digest | ArtsJobs | Creative Access (Jobs) | JournoResources | Lectures.London | MediaBeans (media jobs) | QMUL Careers | Presspad | Tower Hamlets Arts | Write at Home (freelance writing opps)

Applications for Leverhulme Trust’s Early Career Fellowship Scheme Open [Deadline 12 pm 5 January 2022]

Early career researchers seeking support for their application to the Leverhulme Trust’s Early Career Fellowship scheme are invited to get in contact with us from now [deadline 12 noon, 5 January 2022].

The School of English and Drama invites early career researchers seeking support for their application to the Leverhulme Trust’s Early Career Fellowship Scheme to submit to us:

  • An academic CV of not more than 2 pages to demonstrate your research stature.
  • An outline research proposal including title, abstract (100 words), details of past and current research (250 words), a 2-page (A4) project outline, and a statement detailing relevant research being carried out in the School of English and Drama and your reasons for choosing Queen Mary (200 words).

Please send the above to Dr Huw Marsh, Research Manager, at: sed-research@qmul.ac.uk by no later than 12 pm on 5 January 2022.

Full scheme details including eligibility criteria can be found on the Leverhulme Trust’s website: https://www.leverhulme.ac.uk/funding/grant-schemes/early-career-fellowships

All outline proposals will be considered by a School committee and applicants will be notified of the shortlisting outcome in the week of Monday 24 January 2022. Shortlisted candidates will be put forward for approval by the Humanities and Social Sciences Faculty Executive, who will report their decisions by 27 January. Decisions will then be communicated to candidates, and the School will work with successful applicants to finalise their applications. The final deadline for submission of approved applications is 4pm on 24 February 2022.

The School recommends that applicants make clear the following in applications (CVs and proposals):

  • the strength of your academic record (e.g. classifications, awards, time taken to complete your PhD, etc.)
  • the strength of your research record (e.g. publications (including their length; and if forthcoming, where they are at in the process); presentations; research leadership; if you make practice as research, indicate how it is research; etc.)
  • what research you will publish/disseminate through the fellowship
  • the importance of doing your fellowship in the School of English and Drama at QMUL (e.g. synergies with staff and research centres)
  • your proposal’s importance, originality, methods, critical contexts, resources, structure and outputs.

London Performance Now: Pink Lemonade at Bush Theatre 2021 by Lola Ellenberg – Review

Pink Lemonade | Bush Theatre

There are few things as uniquely special as a live theatre performance that educates, inspires, and leaves you in awe. In Pink Lemonade, a one-person show playing at the Bush Theatre, writer and actor Mika Onyx Johnson does exactly that, and we are all better for it.

Pink Lemonade follows Mika on their journey navigating romantic relationships and living as a trans masculine person. Whether it is because trans stories often go unheard or due to the fact that this is an entirely innovative piece of theater, I was left with the powerful impression that this was unlike anything I had seen before. Mika combines movement with monologue, utilizing rap and spoken word to tell their profound story. It is a testament to Mika’s storytelling skills that this incredibly personal narrative is so natural to empathize and connect with. The plot, like many other aspects of the show, is unconventional. In lieu of a traditional three-act structure, Mika instead floats through time and space, taking us back to life pre-transition and breaking the fourth wall to tell us directly their experience through the lens of memory. This experimental mode of storytelling so closely reflected Mika’s lived experience, and I found myself entirely caught up in Mika’s world and words from start to finish.

When my friends asked me what Pink Lemonade was about, I had a hard time articulating the magic that I saw. “It’s about sexuality, identity, life…” and they looked at me with curiosity and confusion. Though there is a plot – the show is essentially told through the parallel romantic experiences Mika had with two women, respectively – the show transcends the limitations of a traditional plot-driven play. As Mika raps, moves, or speaks, we are left with the feeling that this isn’t just dialogue, but is philosophy. There is something so enlightening about the way Mika tells their stories, and it also speaks to the power of live theater in general. I attempt to do so here, but it would be impossible to perfectly generate through words what we as a joint audience saw take place in the Bush Theater.

Pink Lemonade takes place in the black box studio, and the glowing, colorful lights illuminate not just Mika but also the audience members that surround the stage. I had the feeling that this was a communal experience, and it was absolutely fitting that this was live theater, because the show, space, and most significantly, Mika, were just teeming with life.

I can understand how Pink Lemonade may not be for ‘everyone’ – it is bold and liberated and empowered, and though in my opinion those are amazing qualities, I wouldn’t be surprised if some disagreed. However, I would urge anyone with the opportunity to see Mika’s work to do so. The one note I wrote down in my notebook immediately after the play was, “Mika is an artist in every sense of the word.” Artistry like this is rare, and when it does present itself, we would be remiss in missing it.

Read more about London Performance Now module

New Learning Resources in the School of English and Drama

The School of English and Drama is delighted to announce new resources are available:

  1. Digital Theatre+ (digital recordings of theatre productions).  This is in addition to Drama Online (digital recordings of theatre productions and play scripts), which we started subscribing to last year.
  2. Oxford Research Encyclopaedia of Literature (dynamically updated key reference work on literature)
  3. Alexander Street Academic Video Online (documentaries and films across all subject areas)

Don’t forget you also get access to the following resources:

  1. Linkedin Learning – (courses on key skills including video editing)
  2. Box of Broadcasts – (recordings from TV – thousands of films and shows)
  3. Financial Times – (arts and culture coverage)

New Book ‘P’ from English Creative Writing Graduate David Mitchell

QMUL English and Creative Writing Graduate David Mitchell has a novella available for pre-order from The Plastic Brain Press under the pseudonym D Rudd-Mitchell. The Novella is called P and explores themes of enviroment, intolerence, history, information and status.

David was a member of the first English with Creative Writing cohort at QMUL  Details of his book are available from  https://www.plastic-brain-press.com/listing/1089686426/pre-order-for-p-by-drudd-mitchell  

Since studying at QMUL David has also published poetry in magazines, a shared chapbook and the anthology Poems from a Green Blue Planet, which was A GUARDIAN CHILDREN’S BOOK OF THE YEAR 2019.  

London Performance Now: Romeo and Juliet at Shakespeare’s Globe 2021 by Joseph Gallagher

Romeo & Juliet | Shakespeare’s Globe | Until 17 Oct 2021 | Tickets from £5

I walked into the globe theatre with a certain expectation of what performance I was going to be watching. I did not see that performance. The setting of the show was within modern day and the dress matched it. Vans, Nike tracksuits and neck tattoos among other features set the play very much in the 21st century, mixed in with modern day slang and drug abuse. Ola Ince overall, created a modern day version of Shakespeare’s most well known play, but it is not without its flaws.

Ince decided to focus on the mental health aspect within Romeo & Juliet, which I for one, had never really appreciated nor noticed if truth be told. The need for this message in todays society is extremely needed. With how much mental health is spoken about recently and especially with under 25’s, Ince made the correct decision to focus on this element of the play.

However, this did have some major fallbacks, Will Edgerton’s ‘Tybalt’ had very little time onstage so much so that when Romeo kills him, the weight of the moment did not strike a single nerve as I was left wondering why I should care for this person and therefore why should Juliet care enough to try and convince her parents to postpone her marriage to Paris.

Within the play too were multiple moments when the actors would break the fourth wall and directly address the audience with some quite eye opening statistics. The statements made had a lot of prevalence within the story and where a good addition to the action. However, the way they were delivered, in a very jarring pause of the performance and a preachy tone created an uncomfortable feature in the performance that didn’t work a single bit.

Alfred Enoch’s ‘Romeo’ and Rebekah Murrell’s ‘Juliet’ were fantastic within the performance. Both had a lovely frantic energy to them that could only be given to youth. An organised chaos with Romeo often on a BMX just lingering in the street and Juliet running around her bedroom throughout. The infamous balcony unfortunately lends itself to have Murrell on the actual balcony of the Globe but Enoch running through the audience (with a mask) and swinging on ladders placed in the pit added a new element to what can be a cliché scene. Sirine Saba as the nurse was a personal highlight. Even when not the main focus of a scene, she constantly stole the show with her exaggerated expressions and a comic relief with the second half of the show. Zoe West and Adam Gillen shined as the loveable rogues of Benvolio and Mercutio respectively. The cast as a whole was brilliant but they were my standouts. The run finished on October 17th as the Globe shall begin its run into the Christmas season with ‘The Fir Tree’ starting on December 20th.

Photo credit: Alfred Enoch as Romeo, Sirine Saba as Nurse and Zoe West as Benvolio in Romeo & Juliet, Globe Theatre, Shakespeare’s Globe, 2021. Photographer: Marc Brennert, Globe Theatre, Shakespeare’s Globe, 2021. Photographer: Marc Brenner

Read more about London Performance Now

SED Opportunity Digest – 15 October 2021

Welcome to our digest full of interesting events, opportunities and schemes that may help you meet collaborators, improve their career prospects or simply broaden your horizons.

Please let us know if you have any suggestions for next edition via sed-web@qmul.ac.uk

From QMUL, Partners & Friends

Winners Announced for the 2021 Queen Mary Wasafiri New Writing Prize

Find out the winners here

There Are Plenty of Businesses like Show Business: Launch Event for ‘Marxist Keywords for Performance’ — 20 October 2021, 7:30 PM (BST) with a soft start at 7 PM

This year we return to QUORUM with a research group Performance and Political Economy. 

This year, we will be hosting events both online and in person whenever possible. Tickets are free but please RSVP. 

For in person ticket, click here.

For online ticket, click here.


Queen Mary Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies 2021 – Tuesday 19 October 2021

Nicole Aljoe (Northeastern): Racing the Rise of the Novel: Black Lives and the Development of the English Novel from 1688-1832 

This talk comes from a larger study that aims to analyze the complex relationships between the development of the novel and narratives of Black lives in Britain during the long 18th-century (1688-1837), as well as contribute to conversations about the impact of notions of race and empire on the development of the novel in Europe during this time. Tracking the representations of Black lives across novels and other texts throughout the century highlights the ways in which Black and White writers used these representations to engage particular questions not only about the aesthetics and form of the new genre, but also important attendant questions about notions of subjectivity and human rights. The appearance of a range of black characters and protagonists in early European writings over the course of the century provides a useful framework for revealing an/Other story of the development of the novel that complicates the often nativist and frequently exclusive narratives of the “rise” of the genre that continue to dominate in the field. In essence, this talk aims to explore what happens when Watt’s “rise of the novel” model is “recast” with a focus on Black texts. 
Chair: Markman Ellis

All welcome

Time: 17:15–18.30pm. GMT.
 
Venue: Online via ZOOM and IN PERSON.

If you wish to join this seminar ONLINE Please register here —
https://qmul-ac-uk.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYsfumsqj8sGNcqEGKDDlbL9nA8hFNgjfT3

If you wish to join this seminar IN PERSON please come to the Francis Bancroft Building, Room 109, Queen Mary University of London, E1 4NS (no. 31 on this map https://ph.qmul.ac.uk/sites/default/files/Article/Mile-End-campus-map.pdf). If you are attending in person, please e-mail w.bowers@qmul.ac.uk to confirm this, so we can keep track of numbers for social distancing and refreshments. 

All About Inclusion: In Conversation with Black Alumni on Wed, 20 Oct 2021, 17:30 – 19:00 

At this event, a panel of Black alumni will speak about their journey as a Black person looking for work and their personal experiences in the workplace. You will have the opportunity to ask questions and find out more about our speakers. 

Click here to self enroll to our QMPlus module, which you will need access to to view the event. If you are a graduate, please contact careers-events@qmul.ac.uk 

If you require captioning for online events, we recommend using the Google Chrome extension. Find out how to do this by clicking here.

English Postgraduate Research Seminar – Thursday 21 October

“Shakespeare and Dickinson at the White Heat

Prof. Ivy Schweitzer (Dartmouth College)

Get Zoom Link Here (Registration Needed)

The Last Gasp: A Recalibration by Split Britches – Tue 19—Sat 23 Oct 2021, The Pit at Barbican

Equipped with some know-how and a touch of irony, Peggy Shaw and Lois Weaver (Queen Mary Drama) use spoken word and movement to respond to a world turned upside down. How do you survive a loss? First you recalibrate…

Little Wimmin by Figs in Wigs at Battersea Arts Centre – 20-28 October

Drama Grads Figs in Wigs are coming out of isolation and this time they’ve got their period
(dresses)

Presenting a live art, feminist ‘adaptation’ of Louisa May Alcott’s classic novel Little Women. Wild, irreverent and cosmically comical, this production dismantles the traditional canon to make way for the doomed future of humankind.

Freedom and Independence Theatre Festival – From 5 November

For many years, Tower Hamlets Council and Queen Mary University of London have been proud to support A Season of Bangla Drama, an annual festival which brings the borough’s communities together each November to celebrate the magic of theatre as well as the arts and cultural traditions of Bangladesh.

As we mark the 50th anniversary of the Independence of Bangladesh, this has been renamed the Freedom and Independence Theatre Festival.

The themes in the title have inspired the plays and events that make up this year’s programme. We are delighted that we are continuing to profile British Bangladeshi theatre as an important way to spotlight key events of 1971, tell untold stories, and reach out to new audiences.

The variety of plays on offer cover topics including the plight of women, the tales of freedom fighters, the journeys of refugees such as the Rohingya and Vietnamese, as well as the power of protest. 

There will be a fringe programme of events including a Bengali heritage walk, film screenings, an international youth writing project, talks and exhibitions.

The festival will also provide opportunities for audiences to participate through Q&As, and to be immersed in the richness of poetry, music and dance.

This is a fantastic way to learn about the history, legacy and impact of what unfolded half a century ago.

For the full programme listings, please visit our What’s On page.

Outside QMUL

Roots at Wilton’s Music Hall – Until 30 October

1927’s Roots is a medley of these rarely-told stories, an anthology of ancient folk tales by anonymous authors. Tales of tyrannical ogres, magic bird’s hearts and very, very fat cats are brought to life with 1927’s signature fusion of handcrafted animation and storytelling.

Flairbox – Performing Arts Pro Workshops

I wanted to let you know about FlairBox’s Workshop Week, an exciting opportunity for your students to learn from industry Professionals through online masterclasses, at a discounted price.
Places are going rapidly, but we want to do everything we can this year to support graduating and recently graduated students by giving them as much support as possible in entering the industry. 

I’m delighted to be able to offer the students of Queen Mary University a 20% discount on all of our workshops! (including masterclasses with Casting Director Nancy Bishop, United Agents’ Olivia Jones, and viral comedy sensation Jonny Weldon). All your students need to do is apply the discount code: DramaSchoolRef  when purchasing a workshop space through our website FlairBox.

(RE)CONNECT WORKSHOPS

For young people aged 16+

Thu 28 – Sat 30 Oct; 11.30am – 1pm; £4.50 each + Booking Fee

Want to start your own podcast, write your own music or create your own solo show? We’ve got a series of workshops this month from amazing artists to help get your creative juices flowing. 

MAKE YOUR OWN SOLO WORK
Apphia Campbell
Thursday 28 October
BOOK NOW
MAKE YOUR OWN PODCAST
Cherise Hamilton-Stephenson
Friday 29 October
BOOK NOW
MAKE YOUR OWN KIND OF MUSIC
Lilly Pollard
Saturday 29 October
BOOK NOW

Further sources of interesting events, opportunities and jobs are…

Apples & Snakes Artists Newsletter | Arts Admin E-Digest | ArtsJobs | Creative Access (Jobs) | JournoResources | Lectures.London | MediaBeans (media jobs) | QMUL Careers | Presspad | Tower Hamlets Arts | Write at Home (freelance writing opps)

London Performance Now: Romeo and Juliet at Shakespeare’s Globe 2021 by Morgan Tuttle

Romeo & Juliet | Shakespeare’s Globe | Until 17 Oct 2021 | Tickets from £5

Many people have expectations or ideas when they hear Romeo and Juliet. It could be grand ideas of Elizabethan costumes or a tragic teen romance, but the recent production at the Globe likely had many reassessing these ideas.

An extraordinary cast, led by Alfred Enoch of How to Get Away with Murder fame in the titular role of Romeo, comes on at the beginning with everyone dressed in red and black colored contemporary clothes. One by one, all of them introduce themselves, and the band, while Mercutio recites the famous opening. The show then kicks off not with dramatic Shakespearean language but a statistic. Throughout the entire production, this sharing continues with several actors breaking their character to share a fact or statement about teen mental health, the effects of a damaged home, or societal dangers. These facts are repeated on an LED screen at the top of the stage like an ominous foretelling of the scene below. From this, it becomes very clear that this is no longer a story of love.

The play itself has had cuts made, like many productions of Shakespeare’s works. Those who know Romeo and Juliet like the back of their hands might find themselves thinking this production lacking in romance. While many of the romantic soliloquies that are well known are cut, a different and rougher version of this beloved play arises.

This interpretation emphasizes the tragedy at the heart of this show and the actions that cause it. This is a stage that is rarely still with actors riding BMX bikes and violent fights and encounters happening often. Music can be heard in the background, loud, brassy, and percussive, bringing greater levels of tension to the story. This choice in keeping actions over romance coupled with the statistics give a darker story.

Romeo and Juliet are no longer two love-struck teenagers who are driven by their passions. They are two teens who find comfort in each other in a world where violence finds them both at home and in society. The choices of the director and company give a production that finds itself aimed at a younger audience. It creates a story that many can relate to or see themselves in and then follows up the action with resources to get help if they related to any content.

While this is may not be a production for the Shakespeare purist, it is well worth the time to go and see it.  

Photo credit: Rebekah Murrell as Juliet and Alfred Enoch as Romeo in Romeo & Juliet, Globe Theatre, Shakespeare’s Globe, 2021. Photographer: Marc Brenner

Read more about London Performance Now

Solitudes Project Podcast on Award Shortlist – Vote Now!

One of the podcasts produced by Natalie Steed for the Solitudes project has been shortlisted for an award. It’s an episode on ‘The Mind’ in our podcast series, ‘Spaces of Solitude’.

It was curated by Akshi Singh and features the psychoanalyst and writer Adam Phillips, the poet Denise Riley, and the neuroscientist Sarah Garfinkel. It’s a terrific podcast, and of course we’re delighted that it’s been shortlisted.

If you listen to it and like it, you can vote for it! There’s a ‘people’s vote’ – link below. But please do it soon, as the results will be made public next month.

https://vote.lovieawards.com/PublicVoting#/2021/podcasts/features/best-individual-episode

QUORUM Drama Research Seminar 20 Oct: There Are Plenty of Businesses like Show Business: Launch Event for ‘Marxist Keywords for Performance’

There Are Plenty of Businesses like Show Business: Launch Event for ‘Marxist Keywords for Performance’

by Performance and Political Economy research group (Jaswinder Blackwell-Pal, Shane Boyle, Ash Dilks, Caoimhe Mader McGuinness, Olive Mckeon, Lisa Moravec, Alessandro Simari, Clio Unger, Martin Young).

20 Oct, 7PM (BST) on Zoom or in person at ArtsOne

How to book: Free tickets but RSVP, please. In person booking: bit.ly/qm2010ip Online booking: bit.ly/qm2010o

Theatre and performance studies is awash with scholarship that examines performance in relation to its labour processes, modes of management, financial infrastructures, and so forth. But there lacks shared critical understanding of what terms such as “value” or “capital” mean and how they can be applied when studying performance forms like theatre, dance, or live art. The range of meanings that performance scholars attach to the word “commodity” or even the seemingly obvious entities of “class” and “the state,” for example, reveals more than a slight degree of imprecision or disagreement. It indicates a lack of systematic thought and, consequently, a need to interrogate the categories used for discussing performance’s political economy. 

Collectively written by nine people, “Marxist Keywords for Performance” (2021) contributes to growing critical attention within theatre and performance studies towards political economy by defining key Marxist concepts and exploring how they can be applied to study performance. Ahead of our project’s publication in a joint issue of The Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism and Global Performance Studies: GPS, this presentation introduces our aims in writing the keywords and reflects on the collective research, carried out in the midst of the pandemic, that went into them. As Tithi Bhattacharya (2017) reminds us, the aim of any critique of political economy should be to “restore to the ‘economic’ process its messy, sensuous, gendered, raced, and unruly component: living human beings capable of following orders—as well as of flouting them.” A critique of the political economy of performance, as we understand it, should have this same goal.

Thank you for your help!

Best

Hanife Schulte, Carolyn Naish, Gill Lamden, Tobi Poster-Su, Souradeep Roy, and Sam Čermák

QUORUM Committee
Drama Department; Queen Mary, University of London
queenmaryquorum@hotmail.co.uk
https://quorumqmul.wordpress.com/

@QuorumQMUL

Drama Study Support for 2021 First Years

Drama pass scheme

Hello I am Emma a drama student and student organiser for the PASS scheme. Please see above for a flyer and short desciption of the scheme. Our first session is this week Thursday so we hope to see you there!

The PASS Scheme is a nationally accredited scheme, working to guide students into further understanding subject content and improving academic performance. We hold mentor-led discussions around topics and modueles of your choice; a friendly community and a motivating environment, open for all students studying Drama.

We are running in person every week Thursday 3-4pm in Bancroft room 3.15 (25), and online 3-4pm, every last Thursday of the month. 

We look forward to seeing you this Thursday the 14th in Bancroft for a great first session!

Link to our online sessions (Thursday 28th Oct):

https://teams.microsoft.com/l/team/19%3aK4YtsI5p66RBbvIIjn-sJofrkmiI9g2bvRfPxQZjWBM1%40thread.tacv2/conversations?groupId=739c27ef-ef4e-407e-8c6c-a2d1056ef74c&tenantId=569df091-b013-40e3-86ee-bd9cb9e25814