The Importance of Trans Rights in the Fight Against Fascism – Trans Day of Remembrance

In honour of Trans Day of Remembrance on 20 November James Queay exposes the history of the term ‘trans’ and the importance of protecting trans rights.

In the mass consciousness one may be forgiven for seeing the battle for trans rights being a modern one, or even one that only goes back as Stonewall in 1969. However, the term ‘trans’ was first coined in Berlin in 1910 (though the fight of course can be traced back even further if one looks).

Magnus Hirschfeld was a Physician and Academic who championed queer rights seeking to assert the views of it being a natural occurrence through case studies from every culture he could reach. It should be noted that the ethics of this were in no way up to modern standard, but for the period in time we will let that rest. While his vocabulary was limited compared to today’s vast lexicon of queer terms, his work to identify that trans people were separate from gay people was key in further works.

Hirschfeld led the Scientific-humanitarian committee to gather 5000 prominent signatures to overturn paragraph 175 of the section of the German penal code that, since 1871, had criminalized homosexuality. Despite his works being rejected a number of times he championed this cause making headway until the takeover of the Nazi party. Hirschfeld in his efforts to bring about change and promote queer rights additionally opened the Institute for sexual research under the Weimar Republic (A governing force far more tolerant and liberal than previously experienced). This institution not only educated in queer and heterosexual matters but also offered medical consultations to the People of Germany. Hirschfeld himself lived with his partner Karl Giese in the institute, offering himself up as an openly gay man in a world he wished to better, even when that world was not necessarily ready to hear what he had to say.

When Von Papen launched a Coup in 1932 which instated him as the Reich Commissioner the institute stayed open. Papen actively enforced paragraph 175; and in the face of this nigh on further criminalisation of Homosexuality Hirschfeld kept his doors open. However, in 1933 Hindenburg instated Adolf Hitler as the Chancellor. On the 6th May the same year a group of university students belonging to the national socialist student league stormed the institute. They began to smash what they could before the SA (Nazi Storm Troopers) arrived to systematically burn the books. Book burnings had got into full swing months earlier with April featuring the Wartburg festival one of the most prolific book burnings that would occur. Thus, the importance of Nazi suppression of Queer media cannot be overstated. Some reports suggest that the first book burned specifically was Magnus Hirschfeld’s research on Transgender Individuals, and this signifies their importance in the fight against Fascism.

Transgender rights in many ways typify everything that is wrong with Fascism. They promote self-expression, of individuality and the freedom to change and evolve into the best version of one’s self. For fascist ideologies these ideas are dangerous because they draw on how weak Fascism is, it is rigid and restraining, it cares not for its people and incites hatred.

Thus, championing trans rights and queer rights as an extension of that is inexplicably linked with fighting against right extremism. There was no strategic benefit to the Nazi’s for burning Hirschfeld’s work, and he himself was abroad public speaking at the time so he was not silenced. Rather it is that the Nazis and by extension fascists fear acceptance and tolerance as it is only through suppression and manipulation that they are able to maintain control. This evidenced by the extreme lengths in all cases fascists go to, to manipulate their members; whether that is through misinformation, propaganda, or violence.

The furtherment of trans rights is key to queer people without question, but through this link I believe that simply to be on any ethical standing everyone must also believe in its messages.

Therefore, when we remember the long standing fight for queer rights so too must we remember the responsibility we have to those who have upheld that fight before us; the opposition they faced; and most importantly that we carry those opponents with us.

A Season of Bangla Drama 2020 – An Unmissable British-Bengali Lockdown Treat

A Season of Bangla Drama

12-21 November – Online

Join a festival of free online events including coming of age poetry by local young people, a cook-a-long, community panels and eye-opening plays that explore the British-Bengali perspective. QMUL is a key partner and sponsor.

Mad Hearts – Arts and Mental Health – 2020 Conference – Key Takeaways

by Magali Kelly Frea Scholtis, MSc Creative Arts and Mental Health

Mad Hearts 2021 is in planning now so please follow us on Twitter to find out when booking opens.

On Friday 19 June 2020, the MSc Creative Arts and Mental Health organised the Second Edition of the Mad Hearts Conference, with the theme ‘Solitude and the Encounter’.

This one-day webinar included a conversation with Professor Femi Oyebode, a Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Birmingham, about the inner self and the function of imagination, drawing insights from Fernando Pessoa’s ‘The Book of Disquiet’. This was followed by Laura E. Fischer, an artist, mental health activist, and survivor-researcher who specialises in trauma. She spoke of reclaiming authorship of the trauma narrative through creative expression and she discussed how healing through art depends on three components: survivor leadership, embodiment and creativity.

The final speaker was John Richardson, a filmmaker (see Simon Says: Psychosis) and podcast presenter (Coffee and Psychosis), who sheds light on the mental health system through his documentary work. He spoke of his encounters with the mental health system, what was helpful and unhelpful to his recovery, and how he strives to be true to his values and remain authentic despite the pressure to conform to corporate views both in mental health and in film-making.

After the talks, three artists were nominated to discuss their creative work, which were submitted to the Creative Enquiry stream of the conference, together with a reflection on the theme ‘Solitude and the Encounter’. The painting ‘Shades of Solitude’ by Grace Catchpole, uses colour to capture the nuances of the experience of loneliness, from a peaceful place to rest to a darker experience of grief. The short film ‘Sound’ by Lorna V. represents the funny side of a missed online encounter, that between a client and her therapist, when the client can’t be heard because of a technological glitch and ends up talking to herself. Finally, the short animation ‘Plastic Bag’ by Harris Nageswaran reveals the power of a plastic bag to carry goods but especially love and care to those isolated in hospitals during the lockdown. The artwork ‘Isolation, a familiar issue disguised differently’, by Muhammad Umer, was chosen as the image for Mad Hearts 2020 for its portrayal of a person seen and not seen by the viewers, through the partly deceptive reflection of a mirror. You can view all submissions on the following website: https://sites.google.com/view/mad-hearts-2020/home.

Plastic Bag by Harris Nageswaran
Plastic Bag by Harris Nageswaran

The Mad Hearts Conference ended with a group discussion that included both participants and speakers. During these conversations, we heard from people from all different backgrounds, such as specialists in mental health, users of mental health services, medical students and students of the MSc Creative Arts and Mental Health. Together we delved into contemporary encounters concerning the arts and mental health, uniting clinical, artistic and research perspectives.

During said discussions, we reflected on the contribution of the arts to mental health practice, the agency in one’s own healing, equality in mental health services and the power of isolation. These conversations are important to encourage re-interpretations of contemporary mental health science and practice. It is thus crucial that we continue these discussions!

Mad Hearts 2021 is in planning now so please follow us on Twitter to find out when booking opens.

5 Things to look forward to for 2020 students – in London and online

Welcome to 2020 at Queen Mary. We want to get you excited about studying and exploring London and culture online as part of your university experience.

Here’s some suggestions:

1. Epic Exhibitions

IRL

Go to a blockbuster or tiny exhibition in London:

Online

2. Unusual London

IRL

Uncover unusual sights and experience:

Online

3. See Performance

IRL

Online

4. Give Something Back / Self Care

IRL

Online

5. Explore Industries and Careers in London

IRL

  • Get help from QMUL Careers team to secure internships, work experience and learning opportunities while you are at university
  • Sign up to the creative version of Linkedin, The Dots and follow cool companies that have free events you can attend
  • Find somewhere unusual to work here – the article is by our English graduate Lara Mills

Online

Add your suggestions in a comment below…

Taking a Stand: Letter from QMTC’s Abi Adebayo on George Floyd, #BlackLivesMatter and QMUL’s need to stand in solidarity

We have published the letter from Abi Adebayo from Queen Mary Theatre Company which we received on 1 June 2020 because we think she makes important points. Particularly around how the university can support black students and create the anti-racist university which stands up for social justice. Everyone has a responsibility to make sure our university stands up for these values.

Abi would like to recognise the following people who have helped with the creation of the posters, protests and spoken word pieces:


Good afternoon, 

I am writing to you as the Vice president of Queen Mary Theatre Society and as a black student within your university. 

As I am sure you are aware of the countless protests, wide-spread media coverage, and news headlines around the subject of institutional, systematic, and general racism around the world, there has been a nationwide call for the end of injustice towards black people in all capacities. The murder – through means of suffocation – of George Floyd in the United States by the hands of the Minneapolis police was not only barbaric it was symbolic of how black people are stifled in every aspect of our lives due to continued active and passive racism. George Floyd’s name is now on the ever-growing list (that were caught on camera and so are aware of) of black people mercilessly killed for committing the crime of nothing more than simply being black in this month alone. We have called for Justice for Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old black man shot while he was jogging around his neighborhood, we have called for justice for Breonna Taylor, a 26-year-old EMT who was shot up to six times by police officers who had broken into her home without knocking or announcing themselves under the claim that they were executing a search warrant for a suspected drug dealer, who not only had already been arrested but in fact, did not live at that address – Breonna lost her life and instead of charging the police officers for manslaughter, her boyfriend who was sleeping next to her fired back a single shot at what he thought were intruders, and so was charged and arrested despite the fact none of the police officers were harmed, as well as the fact he legally was allowed to put up arms of his registered gun in the state they were situated in. Black people are constantly being killed due to pre-consisting racist and prejudice bias without their murders being reprimanded further than (at most) a slap on the wrist and paid leave. 

The UK is far from innocent and although shootings are less common, the mistreatment of black people from police officers to the general public is as prevalent as ever today, as it was before. Black people being harassed, beaten, and killed for their existence did not stop or even slow down in pace after the horrific murder of Stephen Lawrence, it has continued and, in some ways, even manifested in more covert ways. Rashad Charles, Mark Duggan, Darren Cumberbatch, Edson da Costa, Adrian McDonald, Sarah Reed, Mark Duggan and more recently Belly Mujinga – who was spat at on duty by a member of the public claiming to have COVID-19 and later fell ill and died herself from the contracted virus – are just a few of the documented black people within the United kingdom that have failed to be protected by the government and society in a whole, due to the colour of their skin. We as a people are tired, we are angry, we are devastated, and we are scared.

What kept me hopeful in this time, is seeing how much as a black community we have gathered together and how our Non-Black allies have stood with us. As the committee of Queen Mary theatre society, we have dedicated all of our social media accounts to #BlackLivesMatter initiatives and in using our platform to show our unwavering support as well as educating posts surrounding institutional, systematic, and general racism for our members. SED alumni such as Ndumiso Peter Ndlovu has taken the time to gather both past and current students of QMUL (like myself) to organise a peaceful protest in LONDON, BRISTOL and MANCHESTER both physically and through Zoom to honour George Floyd and Belly Mujinga, and demand for the further investigation, arrest, and charge of their killers. Efe Uwadiae is another alumnus of QMUL who has dedicated her platform to establishing the right discourse around the #BlackLivesMatter movement. 

I was not only shocked, disheartened, and concerned to see how silent not only the Queen Mary student union has been about the racial injustice that not only affects the black members of their faculty but the black student body within QMUL. It seems as if we have no support from the university, which I find particularly interesting considering the statement made by Colin bailey and the SU surrounding the university being reprimanded for racism, to the point where students felt compelled to spray-paint their views on campus – they felt they weren’t being listened to, and it seems evidently we still aren’t being listened to. I am appalled at the lack of support given to students during this time, especially as QMUL claims to care profusely about our mental health and wellbeing. I am appalled at how despite being sent newsletters on various other subjects, none of them have been addressing the current global pandemic of racism. I have been waiting for QMSU and QMUL to use their platform to not only show solidarity instead of complacency, and still, I have yet to hear a single thing which has in turn led me to write this email. 

If the university claims to be proud of how diverse their student body is, why is it that when we need you to use your platform to not only help us but protect and encourage us to stand for what is right the voice of Queen Mary University of London is nowhere to be found? The slight change of flag creates the idea that QMUL is happy to passively support their students along as they don’t have to make a physical, undeniable stance.

Until our voices, influence and platforms as those against racism are as active as the killing and constant injustice of black people within society, we will never see change. 

In no way do I want to endorse the #alllivesmatter stance and advise the university to stay away from this rhetoric as not only does it demean and belittle the experience of black people globally it also stems as a retaliation of the #BlackLivesMatter movement. It is no secret that all lives matter, the point is there have been too many situations that reinforce the idea that black lives are discounted in the “All”. 

What next…

To conclude, I expect from both QMSU, QMUL, and Colin Bailey to not only educate their students and faculty on the #BlackLivesMatter – why it is important and what it represents. To email all students and/or release a statement on the current climate that both comforts and reassures black students that the university is a safe space for them, and their voices are heard. To boost and encourage students to stand for what is right and carefully sculpt a message that re-lays sensitively the situation of George Floyd and Belly Mujinga in unity with the #saytheirnames movement.

I expect the university and the Student union to use their LARGE platform to show their solidarity with us as black students within the university. Here is the link to the protest led by your students and alumni as well as posts I feel could be reposted by the university and student union. 

I hope to hear from you within the next few days before the protest on the 5th JUNE, with a retort, questions and further information on what can be done, what you plan to do and why the university has been silent thus far. As a university you have a duty of care, as QMTC a society within QMUL we are happy to keep the lines of communication open to ensure that duty is fulfilled. 

Kind regards, 

Abi Adebayo, VP 

Queen Mary Theatre Company

www.qmtc.co.uk


Links and resources

SED Final Years: Dissertation Hall of Fame – Win £25 Love2Shop Voucher with your Selfie or MEME #SEDHallofFame

To celebrate 🎉 our final year students handing in their final projects/dissertations we’re looking for your dissertation selfies 🤳 and memes 🤣.

You could win a £25 Love2Shop voucher for sharing your dissertation selfie or meme.

Give us the a pic with the story of your disso or make a gag-worthy MEME to win!

How to enter…

  1. Email us your picture or MEME, full name and caption to: sed-web@qmul.ac.uk
  2. Tag us @QMULSED on Instagram or Twitter with the hashtag #SEDHallofFame
  3. Message or post to our Facebook Page here

Entry closes on 3 July 2020 at 5pm. Our team will pick the winners on or shortly after 3 July so please get your entry in before then! There will be 2 winners one for selfie and one for meme. We will contact winners via email so keep an eye out on your inbox after 15 June.


Fahima Begum – BA English

Samiha Begum – BA English

Aysel Dilara Kasap- BA English with Creative Writing

Chloe Hocking – BA English

“I have had the most amazing time at QM over the last three years. I’ve met some soulmates. Had a few breakdowns. Hit my limit of daily replacement library cards. Spent £49000 on coffee. And had most of the happiest moments of my life. I know that this dissertation doesn’t sum up everything I’ve learnt and everything that I can do now (notably, go to the shop without having a panic attack). But it was definitely one of the hardest things I’ve ever done. And I’m proud of myself for doing it. A huge thank you to every lecturer, advisor, member of staff, and student for helping me through. From helping me choose a dissertation topic to making me a coffee with a smile. Also- to everyone who is still working on their dissertations- you can do this and you will do this. Remember not to compare your own academic achievements to other people’s because yours are just as brilliant and just as important. Okay I’m done now. Gonna go drink, eat, and watch Netflix… Until I have to start the next one.”

Hana Hussein – BA English with Creative Writing

“1 word down 9,999 to go”

Kirsten Murray – BA English

“Standing in the North Sea was not the original dissertation hand in photo I had in mind. Although I am currently some 300 miles from the bustling city of London, my time at Queen Mary has enhanced my passion for literature and developed my personal and academic confidence. The supportive SED staff have even inspired me to continue my studies at the University of Cambridge in a genre, Romanticism, I initially loathed when I arrived in London three years ago.”

Christian Richardson – BA English with Creative Writing

Christopher Smith – BA English

Eleni Sophia – BA English

View this post on Instagram

Yay! Three years & many matcha lattes later, I became a CEO, an author of three poetry collections and completed my dissertation 🙌🏼🥂 I’m so grateful for my time at Queen Mary; both, the @qmulsed & the enterprise department have helped me expand Perspective Press Global and I’m so thankful 🙌🏼 Anyone who’s starting university, please take each opportunity as it comes: go to events, make use of your careers departments — it doesn’t matter if you don’t know anybody, go alone! It can be scary but you never know what opportunities may rise ✨ I’ve also just hired my first employee & I’m super excited to see where my journey takes me 🌺 Thank you to everyone who’s purchased a copy of either book — I appreciate you all so much 💫 Lots of love, Eleni Sophia 🥂

A post shared by Perspective Press Global Ltd (@perspectivepressglobal) on

Demi Whitnell – BA English

Announcing: ‘Diaspora Speaks’ – new student publication – Interview with co-founder Sawdah Bhaimiya

We caught up with English student Sawdah Bhaimiya to talk about the new publication Diaspora Speaks which aims to showcase the journeys, opinions and experiences of students of colour.

Tell us about Diaspora Speaks. How did the idea come about and who are the key team?

The main purpose of Diaspora Speaks Magazine is to highlight the journeys, opinions and experiences of students of colour. The idea started forming in my head around November last year, and at the time I was very involved with student media as I was working with Cub Magazine, The Print News, Quest Radio, as well as QMTV. I started to become more aware of the lack of diversity in journalism as a whole and I wanted to fill that gap by creating something that ethnic minority students at the university could get involved with whether they have experience with writing or not. As 69% of Queen Mary students are BAME it seemed right to create a platform where they can be heard. 

I voiced my opinions to a fellow CUB writer, Sara Omar who loved the idea from the start. We watched it grow from an idea to a real outlet and we’re excited to see how far it will go in the next year. The team is currently just Sara and myself, but we are looking to expand and we have open applications to become a part of our 2020/2021 team. 

What or who are your inspirations for working in journalism and starting the publication?

My inspirations for working in journalism are probably Stacey Dooley, Iman Amrani, Liv Little and Anila Dhami. I think real journalism is about being open-minded, exploring different perspectives, and telling the stories that matter. I’ve always been quite an inquisitive and curious person and I enjoy telling stories so I found myself gravitating towards journalism because I feel as if I can have a real impact with it.

Furthermore, a publication that I really admire is gal-dem as they carved a space for ethnic minority women and non-binary people of colour, and really established themselves as serious contenders in a journalistic landscape that can often be hostile to POC.

Diaspora Speaks Magazine is modelled after gal-dem, and we really do hope that ethnic minority students get to tell the stories that matter to them.  

How can students get involved with the magazine? What kind of submissions are you looking for?

We have currently opened applications to become a part of our regular team for 2020/2021. The link to the application is https://diasporaspeaksqmul.typeform.com/to/YQQkDL.

We are looking for regular writers, artists, photographers, section editors, graphic designers, and a treasurer. Submissions can include articles, interviews, poetry, artwork, photography, etc. We have various different sections that can be found on our social media and we will be opening submissions soon so to keep updated follow our social media:

Are there any areas you’ve studied on the English course that have influenced your work on Diaspora Speaks?

I studied Postcolonial and Global Literature as a module this year and it has really enlightened me to the extent of the discrimination faced by POC. I was very unaware of the impact of colonialism before I studied it in English this year, but I am now aware that even though colonialism has ended, its impact is still felt today.

I understand and support the efforts of students and teachers who are working towards decolonising the curriculum, the university and more. Diaspora Speaks Magazine I hope will play a part in that effort. 

English and Drama Newsletter – October 2019

Welcome to October. We have some incredible events and news to share with you so please read on…

Picture: Meet our student of the month Şenay Camgöz from MA Live Art

Read Şenay’s post

Events

OCTOBER OPEN DAY

Undergraduate Open Day
Saturday 5 October 2019, 10am-3.30pm

From Werewolves to live art, taster sessions at our open day are a great chance to explore English and Drama at QMUL.

Book online

FEATURED

A Season of Bangla Drama
November 2019, Various venues in Tower Hamlets including QMUL

A Season of Bangla Drama is back in Tower Hamlets for another month-long festival of British-Bengali theatre. It is now in its 17th year and firmly established in the area’s cultural calendar and includes a magnificent performance of East Side Story in our very own Great Hall in The People’s Palace.

Download the Season brochure

LISTINGS

New Suns: A Feminist Literary Festival
Saturday 5 October 2019, Barbican

Nisha Ramayya is reading and speaking at New Suns which explores new and continuing debates in feminist approaches to technology. She will also be reading and speaking at: Exploring Poetry as Disruption (Sat 19 Oct – Southbank Centre)  States of the Body Produced by Love (Fri 25 Oct – ICA)

Solitude, Sociability and Insanity in the Nineteenth Century
Tuesday 8 October 2019, ArtsTwo 3.20, QMUL

In the first paper in our 2019/20 seminar series, Mark Lee from the University of Oxford explores devotional solitude through the lens of ‘religious insanity’ in the nineteenth century.

Philosophy as Therapy
Wednesday 9 October 2019, LSE

Our very own Molly Macdonald is on the panel for to discuss whether thinking philosophically can be a form of self-help.

Writing Our Way Home
Tuesday 15 October 2019, Free Word EC1

What role can literature play in combatting hostile environments? In a new and exciting collaboration between Wasafiri and London’s Free Word Centre, Roger Robinson, Winsome Pinnock, Inua Ellams and Bridget Minamore join forces for readings and debate on writing and resistance. 

Find out more

QUORUM Drama Research Seminar: Molly McPhee
Wednesday 16 October 2019, QMUL

Be sure to go to the next QUORUM entitled ‘Miasmatic Performance: Carceral Atmospherics in the Theatre of Clean Break’. Photo: Pests by Vivienne Franzmann. Photo by Jonathan Keenan.

English Postgraduate Research Seminar
17 and 31 October, QMUL

Join us for the next English Postgraduate research events from Patrick Flanery and Kirsty Rolfe.

Follow @QMEnglishPGRS on Twitter for booking links

Doing Dr Duckie’s Homemade Mutant Hope Machines
Tuesday 22 October 2019, Attenborough Centre, University of Sussex

Drama PhD Ben Walters unpacks the world-making approaches to performance, cabaret, culture and care for so-called ‘marginalised’ communities.

Book here

Children Behind Bars

Thursday 24 October 2019, 2.07, Bancroft Building, QMUL

Matthew Ingleby will be giving a paper entitled ‘The Child through the Railings’ at this event.

Matthew will also be hosting a free Children’s Bloomsbury Walking Tour as part of Bloomsbury Festival on 20 October.

The Occult
Wednesday 30 October 2019, LSE, WC2A

How does philosophy contend with the mysterious and the inexplicable? Can it really be logic all the way down, or might rationality stand on something a little spookier? Our very own Nisha Ramayya is on hand to discuss at the Forum for Philosophy.

WEAVE IT! – Exhibition
30 October – 6 November 2019, Stour Space

Decorating Dissidence, run by our very own Jade French and alumni Dr. Lottie Whalen, invite you to ‘WEAVE IT!’ an exhibition celebrating and challenging 100 years of the Bauhaus women’s weaving workshop.   This exhibition considers the legacies of crafting and weaving from modernism to the contemporary, exhibiting textile practitioners who respond in different ways to the Bauhaus and beyond.

The launch night on 1st November will see performances by Rasia Kabir and SED’s Julie Rose Bower, with DJs and drinks. 
ONGOING


Read the Room – Contemporary Poetry Reading Group
Every Wednesday (12-1pm) in the Yurt, St Benet’s Chaplaincy, QMUL

Join Read the Room every Wednesday (beginning 9 October) to gather together and fill the room with poetry. Each week we will read aloud work by a different poet or on a different theme, appreciating the culture of contemporary poetry and a collaborative environment.

Meet other poetry enthusiasts or casual readers, stay on top of poetry events, or just enjoy reading something new. Drop in or just come when you can, Read the Room aims to be an accessible space to have fun with poetry.

Sign up for updates

BOOK AHEAD

Frauke Requardt & Daniel Oliver
Dadderrs

5-6 November 2019, The Place

Daniel is dyspraxic and is too slow.
Frauke has ADHD and is too quick.
They are married and have kids.

Join the couple in the Meadowdrome, their fantastical escapist world. Together you will encounter awkwardly intimate interactive actions, strange dances, sweet and surreal songs, and other off-kilter “grown-up” activities.

This interactive show invites you to explore, converse and play within the neurodivergent realm Daniel and Frauke have created.

Find out more

Turning the Page
Saturday 30 November 2019, QMUL

Launching an anthology of writings, Turning the Page, by the SBS Survivors’ Group: A literary conversation between two groups of BAME women – published writers responding creatively to the stories of the SBS support group.

Email us your event

News

Mojisola Adebayo will be presenting The Interrogation of Sandra Bland at the University of Pittsburgh, USA, in October, culminating in a performance by a huge chorus of black / women-of-colour on stage.

Pragya Dhital joined the English department in September as a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow, with a project on proscribed political pamphlets in colonial India. During the summer she had two articles published: “From ‘Imam ul-Hind’ to Azizul Hind: The ‘One Man Media House’ in Modern India”, South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies, 42:3, 452-468, DOI: 10.1080/00856401.2019.1596778 “Media satyagraha in the broadcast age: underground literature and populist politics during the Indian internal emergency of 1975–1977”, Interventions: Journal of Postcolonial Studies, 21: 7, 942-958, DOI: 10.1080/1369801X.2019.1585908

Michael Hughes (Creative Writing Lecturer)’s book is reviewed by The New York Times: ‘Hughes’s story proceeds at a breakneck cinematic pace, full of booby traps, double agents and arias promising gruesome revenge.’ Read the full review here

Eleni Sophia (aka English student Sophia Hussain) has published her third book ‘This One’s For You’. The poetry collection is about encouraging young women about the importance of self-love and provides words of encouragement for those going through a tough time.

In July, both Khloe and Kourtney Kardashian shared her poem ‘Her Mindset’ from my first poetry book, ‘Good Morning to Goodnight’ on their Snapchat and Instagram stories.

Hari Marini (Research Student Support) has published her poetry collection 28 ΔΙΑΔΡΟΜΕΣ ΤΗΣ | 28 PATHS OF HER. It has been reviewed here.

Susheila Nasta (English Professor) is has edited a collection called Brave New Words: The Power of Writing Now (Out 7 November) an anthology of essays by 15 world writers to celebrate 35 years of Wasafiri but also channels the hot political topics of today. It features work from Bernardine Evaristo, Tabish Khair, Blake Morrison, Mukoma wa Ngugi, Marina Warner and many more.

Pathologies of Solitude project has been awarded a ‘Diversity and Inclusion’ grant by the Wellcome Trust (£21,192) for a project addressing solitude and loneliness as aspects of migrant and refugee experience.

The 18-month project is led by Akshi Singh, postdoctoral fellow on the ‘Pathologies of Solitude’ project, and Nisha Ramayya ( Creative Writing Lecturer at QMUL), and is partnered by Akwaaba, an anti-racist migrant befriending centre in East London.

The project will support six creative arts workshops to be held at
Akwaaba, facilitated by BME writers and other diverse artists. Its
results will be disseminated through zines made with workshop
participants, an exhibition and a public story-telling event.

People Palace Projects’Xingu Encounter has been nominated for a Times Higher Education award for ‘International Collaboration of the Year’. The project explores new ways to work with indigenous people in Brazil to preserve & protect their knowledge & culture.

Mahima Tyagi (English with Creative Writing student) has taken over the School of English and Drama Instagram.

Follow us for news and views from Mahima and our students

Ellen Wiles (English Teaching Fellow) curated and spoke at Asylum Stories: Fact, Fiction, Truth event at British Library.

Follow us on Instagram

Whilst we try our hardest to make sure listings are accurate we recommend contacting the event organiser or registering before attending as mistakes can be made and we apologise for these.

And the Winner of our Tote Bag competition 2019 is…

THANKS TO EVERYONE WHO ENTERED THEIR QUOTATIONS AND DESIGNS. THE WINNER OF OUR TOTE BAG COMPETITION CHOSEN IN A VOTE BY SED STAFF 2019 IS…

NAJIYAH BEGUM (SECOND YEAR ENGLISH STUDENT)

Here’s some of the amazing entries we received and have turned into postcards and bookmarks! Quotes are on postcards too so keep an eye out in goodie bags and our reception area in welcome week.

Ali Campbell launches his new book: The Theatre of the Oppressed in Practice Today (Bloomsbury)

Ali Campbell launching his new book:

The Theatre of the Oppressed in Practice Today (Bloomsbury), which is an introduction to the work of his own teacher and mentor, the legendary Brazilian Director and founder of the Theatre of the Oppressed movement, Augusto Boal.

Seen here with one of Boal’s original Theatre Company Barbara Santos (holding Ali’s book). Ali in turn is holding her own which they are launching in parallel: Theatre of the Oppressed:  Roots and Wings (Kuringa).  The launch took the form of seminars and workshops in Rio de Janeiro at the headquarters of CTO Rio, Boal’s original company, alongside the devising of street theatre pieces and other interventions across the City protesting the draconian measures currently being proposed by the Bolsanaro Administration and impacting heavily on access to State funded Higher Education.

A similar event will happen as part of this year’s Season of Bangla Drama Festival, of which Ali is a co-Director with responsibility for CPD across the Festival’s 17 theatre companies and 6 venues, of which QMUL is one. The Festival begins on Friday 1st November.

10 #QMULHacks Revealed 2019

1. Senate House Library

As a Queen Mary student you can get membership to the University of London’s Senate House Library with it’s lovely comfy armchairs and 3 million books to borrow. Pre-register for your membership card here.

2. Free Online TV

Meet BoB, your new best friend

Long before Netflix ruled your eyeballs, universities created Box of Broadcasts which is a huge free archive of TV recordings. Login with your QMUL credentials and you’ll get access to movies, TV series and documentaries galore. We’re loving the Films, Mostly Gay and London Films watchlist!

3. Free Counselling

We take your well-being seriously

Opening up when you’re feeling low can be the hardest thing, but if you are struggling to cope with life events or need a space to talk openly, our Advice and Counselling team are here to help. They offer a range of free and confidential professional services to all QMUL students including individual counselling, group therapy, specialist drug and alcohol support and much more.

We also offer students access to an online support service called ‘Big White Wall‘ who offer unlimited, 24/7 accessible online support from trained counselors and use other helpful resources – it’s totally free and confidential. Please

4. Free Careers Support

Finding a job can seem like a daunting task, but don’t crumble under the pressure! Whether you have a particular job in mind and want advice to help you get there, or are not sure what you want to do next, the Careers & Enterprise Centre provides QMUL students a range of support to help you prepare for your future. You can even book a practice interview with a Careers Consultant.

5. Free Student Central Membership

As a QMUL student, you’re automatically entitled to be a member of Student Central (formerly University of London Union). Membership is free and enables you to get involved with everything they have to offer including sports, societies, online tickets and access into our bars. Find out more here.

6. Book Library Group Study Rooms

Need a room for you and your friends to study? You can book one of our library group study rooms up to one week in advance for up to four hours per week. The Mile End group study rooms contain a touchscreen PC, connectivity for laptop use and a whiteboard. Whiteboard pens are available from the Library Welcome Desk. 

7. Get free one-to-one tutorials

You may have a big presentation coming up, or perhaps you’re unsure of how to start that 3000 word essay or you may have serious issues with managing your time effectively – spending way too much time looking at memes while procrastinating . Whatever it may be – if you feel like you need extra guidance to brush up on your study skills you can book a free one-to-one tutorial with our Learning Development team. You can even have your tutorial through Skype if you are unable to come to campus. Find out more about their services here.

8. Free access to paywall content providers

Your QMUL library account gives you access to much more than just books. Along with laptops, stationary, videos and DVDs, you also get access to a number of paywall content providers such as The Financial Times. Find out more here.

9. The 339 bus is a local legend

As a QMUL student, you have the added advantage of being at the heart of East London – one of the most diverse and culturally rich areas in the world. Not only can you eat food from virtually anywhere in the world, but the public transport system means you can get around without needing a car – true Londoner style. Also, free Wi-Fi at underground stations – bonus!

The 339 bus is one of our local faves which takes you from the hundreds of stores in Westfield Stratford City on a journey past the world famous Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park to the humble market on Roman Road all the way to the countless curry houses on New Road.

10. SED Freebies

Finally, we want our students to have nice things. Come and say hi or tag us @qmulsed to receive some of our SED freebies. We have an awesome range of products including pens, notebooks, bags and postcards. Also, don’t forget to check out our Instagram and Twitter to see the #sedfreebooks we have available!

4 Unmissable Summer Events in the School of English and Drama

We’re not going anywhere this summer.

Join us for a London staycation full of sizzling summer events in the School of English and Drama at Queen Mary University of London.


Power at Play: responding to Pilot Theatre’s production of Noughts & Crosses (22 May, QMUL):

Join us for a FREE Noughts & Crosses (Malorie Blackman) panel event that asks questions like: ‘What wider questions does this production raise about drama and power? How is drama power for you?’. Join Esther Richardson (Director of Noughts & Crosses) and cast members, Drama academics and students from Queen Mary University of London to discuss and explore the powers of Drama. Book here

The panel includes: Heather Agyepong (Sephie, Noughts and Crosses), Esther Richardson (director, Noughts and Crosses), Gail Babb (QMUL and Goldsmiths lecturer and theatre producer, Talawa), Avaes Mohammed (poet, playwright, performer), Dee Ndlovu (QMUL Drama student and theatre maker).


Show and Tell at All Points East (28 May, Free Festival in Victoria Park, Mile End):

Join us for inspiring mini talks in the park at this free festival which has top street food, stalls and free activities.

Our line up talking about studying and working in the creative industries includes comedian Ahir Shah (BBC3, Live at the Apollo), writer Ayisha Malik, Masterchef winner Natalie Coleman and more pictured above. RSVP here


Open Days (21-22 June, QMUL)

Never been to our campus? Get a feel for the place and get tours and more information from our support departments. Book here

Gothic, Sci-Fi or Fable: Reading Frankenstein then and now – English A-Level Debate (27 June, QMUL)

Is your English teacher always telling you to refer to literary and historical context but you’re unsure what this looks like in practice? Have you heard that there are theoretical and philosophical approaches to texts but aren’t confident using them yourself? Do you wish you knew more about the Gothic genre and how this could link to more contemporary genres, such as Science Fiction?

Three outstanding academics, from Queen Mary’s School of English and Drama, are here to help.

An expert in the body and technology in contemporary culture, Zara Dinnen, a specialist in the Gothic across the nineteenth century, Sam Halliday, and an expert in Romanticism with interests in theory and philosophy, Shahidha Bari, will be unpicking issues around context, theory, genre and ‘Frankenstein’. They will share their expertise on context, theory and genre, to unpack how the text could have been received then and how readers receive it now. They will discuss different frameworks that can be used to interpret this seminal text, and demonstrate to you what it looks like to apply those frameworks in practice.

You will leave this event with a better sense of how to use literary and historical context to develop your analysis of this text; and you will leave knowing what it would be like to study English at Queen Mary, where diversity of ideas is at the heart of what we do.

It promises to be the type of lively and engaging discussion our School of English and Drama is known for!

Line up just announced: SHOW AND TELL at ALL POINTS EAST in Victoria Park on 28 May

Show and Tell at All Points East: In the Neighbourhood in Victoria Park

Tuesday 28 May 2019, 2.15-3.30pm

North Stage, All Points East, Victoria Park

Free and open to all

RSVP on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/events/290092538606956/

See more about the event here: https://www.allpointseastfestival.com/info/nbhd/show-and-tell/

Queen Mary University of London presents Show and Tell, a podcast recording of over 10 inspiring mini talks from current students and special guests on studying and working in the creative industries.

Discover the insider secrets to working in the arts, humanities and social sciences and hear young people with something to say from one of London’s most inclusive universities.

Show and Tell has been running for 2 years at Queen Mary with over 35 speakers from TV producers, award-winning writers, researchers and journalists inspiring over 300 people to enter these industries.

LINE UP

  • Alain English: Scottish actor, writer, autism advocate and performance poet.
  • Ayisha Malik: Ayisha Malik is author of this year’s CityReads London book, ‘Sofia Khan Is Not Obliged’ (often called ‘The Muslim Bridget Jones’), ‘The Other Half of Happiness’ and upcoming novel, ‘This Green and Pleasant Land’. She is also the ghost writer for Great British Bake Off winner, Nadiya Hussain’s adult fiction.
  • Ahir Shah: Ahir Shah (BBC Three, Live at the Apollo) is a stand-up comedian and writer based in London. He has been twice nominated for Best Show at the Edinburgh Comedy Awards, in 2017 and 2018.
  • Gabriel Krauze: QMUL English graduate and ‘estate-noir’ author Gabriel Krauze (Vice) has just signed with publisher 4th Estate publish his first novel ‘Who They Was’. Gabriel Krauze grew up in London in a Polish family and was drawn to a life of crime and gangs from an early age. Now in his thirties he has left that world behind and is recapturing his life through writing.
  • Mile End Community Project: MCP will show their Chicken Film, which explores the fried chicken shop phenomenon in Tower Hamlets and provided insight into what fried Chicken means to different communities.
  • Nadia Valman: Dr Nadia Valman is a literary historian at Queen Mary University of London who has led various public projects including on the history of Jewish people in the East End, The Royal London Hospital and Brick Lane.
  • Natalie Coleman: Natalie Coleman was winner of MasterChef in 2013. Since winning MasterChef Natalie Coleman has worked with some of the UK’s best restaurants including Le Gavroche (Michel Roux Jr) and is currently the head chef at immersive dining concept in Waterloo, Hello Darling.

Plus: Five current students will give their creative manifestos for the future: Blanka Plocha, Aamir Ayyub, Simone Hazanavicius-Lovisone, David Mitchell and Saramarie Harvey.

About All Points East: In the Neighbourhood

Bank Holiday Monday 27 to Thursday 30 May 2019 | Opening Hours: 10am – 9.30pm daily

Four days of Free Entry and Free Activities in Victoria Park

Four days of FREE entry and a host of FREE activities across BANK HOLIDAY MONDAY and HALF TERM WEEK: Outdoor Cinema, Live Music, Creative Workshops, Street Food, Pop Up Bars, Panels & Talks, Sports & Wellbeing, Family Activities AND LOADS MORE FOR ALL THE FAMILY.

Full programme here: https://www.allpointseastfestival.com/info/nbhd/

PhD and Teaching Associate Karina Likorish Quinn leads ‘Celebrating Multilingualism in the Classroom’ Workshop – 1 June 2019

Date: 1 June 2019, 2.00pm – 3.30pm

Venue: Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

One in five state-educated UK children are exposed to a language other than English at home. This figure rises to 50% of state-educated children in areas such as London or Leicester. And yet there is no space in the National Curriculum for children to explore their multilingualism.

This free workshop, led by Karina Lickorish Quinn and Rahul Bery, will explore ways to bring multilingualism into the secondary MFL and English classroom as a resource that can enrich all students’ interaction with the learning of reading and writing. The session will furnish educators with practical, versatile activities and resources to use to encourage multilingual students to make creative use of their language skills and to get young people thinking about the importance of language. 

Karina Lickorish Quinn is a Peruvian-English writer, an English teacher at Townley Grammar School, and a Teaching Associate in Creative Writing at Queen Mary University of London. She was previously a lecturer in English and Creative Writing at the University of Reading. Her work has been published by The White ReviewThe Offing, and Asymptote, and she is currently working on her debut novel, represented by Emma Paterson at Aitken Alexander. Karina has a particular interest in multilingual literature and in diversifying the school curriculum, especially in the English classroom.  

Rahul Bery is a translator from Spanish and Portuguese into English, as well as a qualified secondary teacher with experience teaching Modern Foreign Languages and English as an Additional Language in primary and secondary schools in London, Bristol and South Wales, where he is currently based. His translations of authors such as Álvaro Enrigue, Guadalupe Nettel and Daniel Galera have appeared in publications including Granta and The White Review. He is currently the British Library’s translator in residence.

DIY LIFE SKILLS 2019 – Grow your creative skills with free workshops

Develop your skills to work in the creative and cultural industries with this series of free workshops at Queen Mary University of London. The creative skills project formerly known as DIY HIGH SCHOOL is back for 2019 as DIY LIFE SKILLS.

DIY LIFE SKILLS gives our Queen Mary University of London students and our community vital extra practical skills for working in the creative and cultural industries. These include making videos, photography, tax, CVs, public speaking, social media for work and WordPress/blogging.

DIY LIFE SKILLS is supported by Humanities and Social Sciences at Queen Mary University of London. The workshops are free for our students and our local community.


Sadly you missed

#1: MAKE POSTERS THAT POP: Graphics for CV, Instagram & Websites using Photoshop + Indesign

Monday 20 May 2019

11-3pm – Intermediate

3-6pm – Beginners

Take your poster out of word and create stunning visuals for social media headers and print posters.

#2: TAKE GREAT PIX: Digital Photography 101 – DSLR with Holly Revell

Wednesday 22 May 2019

2-5pm: Intermediate DSLR

A picture is said to be worth a 1000 words and this is more true than ever in the age of social media. Join us for an afternoon of photography with DSLR cameras for intermediates. The workshop will include a showcase of Holly Revell’s work and top tips for better performance photography.

#3: VLOG LIKE YOU MEAN IT: Video Production 101

POSTPONED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE – PLEASE STAY TUNED FOR MORE DETAILS

Work with professional videographers to plan, film and edit a short film in one day with pros from Signature Pictures. The intermediate workshop will look at more advanced editing techniques and film production.

#4: DON’T USE WIX: Make a self-hosted WordPress website

Wednesday 22 May 2019

RR2

9am-2pm

WordPress is a professional platform for creating websites and blogs, forget clunky paid for services like Wix and get familiar with customising your site.

#5: INSTAWERK: Social Media & Online Networking

Wednesday 29 May 2019 / 6-8pm

Social media = jobs & opportunities. Ignore it at your cost. This session will cover moving away from using social for well, ‘social’ purposes and look to how these channels can be used to network and make important career connections.

#7: SHOW YOUR SKILLS: Portfolios, Showreels and Video CV

Wednesday 12 June 2019 / 4-6pm

Stand out from the crowd with a video CV or online portfolio.

#6: CAROLINE THE CV WIZARD: CV Clinic

Wednesday 5 June 2019 / 4-6pm

Perfect your key marketing document: work in small groups to improve your CV with the help of Caroline Lisser and her years of challenging students to tailor their CVs for success.

#8: CONFIDENCE BOOSTER: Presentations, Verbal Communication

Monday 17 June 2019 / 6-8pm

Hate speaking in public? Build your confidence with this interactive workshop aiming to enhance your communication competence.

#9: 1-2-1 CAREER PLANNING MEETINGS

Tuesday 25-Wednesday 26 June 2019 / Various appointment times

Book a 1-2-1 appointment to get a bespoke plan for your needs.

#10: GETTING PAID/TAX: How to freelance, get paid and pay tax (And avoid fines!)

Wednesday 3 July 2019 / 4-6pm

The most boring subjects imaginable live and in 3D. But seriously, tax can be complicated so come and get this guide for beginners to the world of work.

If you have any questions or need help booking please email sed-web@qmul.ac.uk