English and Drama Newsletter – April 2021 Edition

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We hope we can inspire you with what’s happening in April in the School of English and Drama.

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Catherine Silverstone

BOOK NOW FOR THE ANNUAL CATHERINE SILVERSTONE LECTURE ON 26 MAY:

Professor Joshua Chambers-Letson (Northwestern University) will present a lecture called: “Love Will Never Do: Black and Brown Love in a Queer Rhythm Nation”.

Book Here (open to all, free & online)

81 Acts

LAST CALL: PAID OPPORTUNITY FOR BLACK STUDENTS: The Mending Room: We’re looking for four students who share a Black British, Caribbean or African Heritage, to support and document a unique project – part of 81 Acts of Exuberant Defiance (humanifesto pictured above) – with the legendary theatre arts activist Tony Cealy.

Led by Tony, you will work over ten Saturday mornings starting 10 April and culminating in a share event on 5 June. If you are in Second/Third Year or are a postgraduate, please contact Ali Campbell (a.m.campbell@qmul.ac.uk) ASAP to get involved, or see this blog post.

Events

2021 UNDERGRADUATE OFFER HOLDER DAY
LAST ONE OF THE YEAR

14 April: Email sed-admissions@qmul.ac.uk for an invite.

TASTERS FOR YEAR 12/13 STUDENTS & TEACHERS

RESEARCH SEMINARS



English Postgraduate Research Seminar

Dr Clare Pettitt (King’s College London) on ‘The Inter-National Novel in 1848’. 
8 April – Free – Online on Zoom
Book Here

Drama QUORUM Seminar
Christa Holka on documenting the lives and processes of her intimate and extended intersectional queer communities.
22 April – Free – Online via Zoom
Book Here

QUEEN MARY CONVERSATIONS


Queen Mary Conversations Week
9-16 April – Free – Online

A week-long series of events that talk about everything from boxing to housework, data science to teeth, childcare to synaesthesia, engineering to zombies. 

Find Out More and Book

LIVE ART LECTURE


2nd Annual Live Art Lecture (LADA/QMUL) by Morgan Quaintance
21 April – Free – Online

  A lecture by Morgan Quaintance: “Only Connect: Affect and Transcendence After Isolation”, in association with MA Live Art.
Book Here

NISHA RAMAYYA APPEARANCES

Nisha Ramayya
(English/Creative Writing) is taking part in lots of events this month: Wednesday 7 April – Nisha is giving a keynote talk on multivocal poetics at ‘Un/crossing language cracks: exophonic practices and realities’, organised by the University of Montreal. Also Wednesday 7 April – Nisha is participating on a roundtable on ‘radical inclusivity, diaspora, and poetry’, hosted by Camden Arts Centre in collaboration with The 87 Press. More infoThursday 8 April – Nisha is presenting new work on mathematical romance, underwater listening, and speculative frequencies at the ‘audiograft festival of experimental music and sound art’. More infoFor more events happening across the faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences see the HSS events newsletter.

News & Links

Book cover

Fatima Abukar (English student) has launched her debut poetry collection Don’t Be Dramatic, Light Her Up, and it’s now available on Amazon. Find out more on Fatima’s Instagram



ALUMNI PROFILES

Celebrating 50 years of Bangladeshi Independence – Alumni story
In this special blog post, alumna Sabiya Khatun (English BA, 2011) talks about a new exhibition in collaboration with Tower Hamlets Archives and the National Portrait Gallery, Bangladesh 50, which will explore the impact of the Bangladesh Liberation War of 1971, and the experience of the Bangladeshi community, many of whom came to settle in Tower Hamlets. In the post, Sabiya talks about how getting involved with the exhibition as a Citizen Researcher resonated with the topics she was interested in during her degree, and why members of the Queen Mary community should go and see it.

Costanza Casati In this profile, writer and screenwriter Costanza Casati (English and Film Studies BA, 2017) talks about her debut novel, The President Show, which follows Iris, a nineteen-year-old thief who is captured and forced to take part in the state-run President Show, a reality programme where ‘Lovers’ have to entertain politicians in a bid to win their freedom. Described as Vox meets The Hunger Games, The President Show is a story of resilience, abuse, betrayal and hope. Costanza also shares details of her “bookstagram” page @youngpeopleread, where she interviews acclaimed debut writers.
Read the profile.

Miranda Burns In this profile, Radio Presenter at Capital and Capital South Coast and Ambassador for Endometriosis UK, Miranda Burns (Drama BA, 2015), reflects on how her weekly slot on QMSU’s Quest Radio allowed her to develop the skills and confidence needed for her successful career in radio, on some of her career highlights to date and how she has had to adapt her shows in response to the pandemic, and shares how she uses her social media as a safe space to talk about women’s health and her own infertility struggles. Read the profile.

Matt Rubery (English)’s essay Bottled Authors: The predigital dream of the audiobook is published in Cabinet Magazine. Read the essay

English and Drama Newsletter – March 2021 Edition

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Events

TASTERS FOR YEAR 12/13 STUDENTS & TEACHERS

24/03: Drama Year 12/13 Taster – Writing Now: Caryl Churchill with Jen Harvie

24/03: English Yr 12/13 Taster: 20th Century Cultural Renaissance w/ Morag Shiach

14/04: Drama Yr 12/13 Taster: Independent Performance Making with Lois Weaver

FEMINIST READING GROUP

The next LAHP Feminist Reading Group is on the 30 March from 5-6:30pm where we will be discussing Audre Lorde’s ‘Uses of the Erotic: The Erotic as Power’.

Download flyer | Sign up

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN

Colloquium: Religion and Victorian Popular Literature and Culture
6-8 May, Online, Free

Registration is now open for both a standalone keynote paper by Anne-Marie Beller and Kerry Featherstone, titled ‘“No greater spiritual beauty than fanaticism”: Women Travellers’ Encounters with Islam in the Nineteenth Century’ (Thursday 6 May) and a colloquium of six themed discussion panels on the expression and representation of religion in nineteenth-century popular culture texts of all kinds. (Friday 7 and Saturday 8 May). The events are free but registration is required. Thanks to Claire Stainthorp (English) for sharing this.

Full programme and registration details here

SOLITUDES SEMINAR


Medieval Solitude in Maria Dahvana Headley’s The Mere Wife
30 March – 5pm (online) – Online, Free
  SED alumna Hetta Howes will be speaking at the Solitudes Past and Present seminar about loneliness, solitude and transformative natural spaces in a contemporary re-telling of Beowulf. All are welcome but booking is required here.

News & Links

Jerry Brotton (English) launches his new BBC series Blood and Bronze. ‘Blood and Bronze’ is the story of Benvenuto Cellini (1500-1571), one of the Italian Renaissance’s most controversial yet frequently overlooked artists, a man who wrote one of the most dramatic autobiographies in art history and lived and worked in the greatest courts and cities in Italy and France, from Florence, Rome, Mantua and Paris to Fontainebleau. He was a goldsmith; sculptor; painter; poet; soldier; musician; thief, priest and murderer.

Thawra

Asia Khatun (English with Creative Writing Alumna) is editor of Thawra, an online literary magazine that provides a platform for minority creatives from budding short story authors to critical academic writers.

Read it here

Michael McKinnie

Michael Mckinnie (Drama) Michael’s new book Theatre in Market Economies is published by Cambridge University Press. The book explores the complex relationship between theatre and the market economy since the 1990s. Bringing together research from the arts and social sciences, the book proposes that theatre has increasingly taken up the mission of the ‘mixed economy’ by seeking to combine economic efficiency with social security while promoting liberal democracy.

Susheila Nasta on Penguin Podcasts

Susheila Nasta (English) is featured on the Penguin podcast on Sam Selvon’s The Lonely Londoners.

Listen here on Apple Podcasts

Nisha Ramayya (English/Creative Writing) has joined the Ledbury Poetry Critics programme as a mentor. Mentors are pictured above. It is a programme to encourage diversity in poetry reviewing culture aimed at emerging critical voices.

She has also published an essay-in-progress. Listening to shadows skoosh in the ‘Sonic Continuum’ issue of The Contemporary Journal (hosted by Nottingham Contemporary). The piece is creative-critical and focusses on soundwalks, sci fi, and submarine cables.

The Wild Track

Margaret Reynolds’ (English) new book about motherhood and adoption: The Wild Track: Adoption, Mothering, Belonging has been widely featured across the media and links to the coverage available online are below. We interviewed Professor Reynolds for our blog here to find out more about what the book’s about.

The Guardian (feature) | The Telegraph (feature) | Monocle Radio (Radio Special)

The White Review

Izabella Scott (English PhD) who is doing avPhD on gender identity and the law with us is the new editor-in-chief of The White Review.


Devina Vassileva (English and Drama student)’s film FriDgid has won multiple awards across Europe and was screened by PEACH magazine on 4 March.

Read more about Devina | Watch the film

Interview with Professor Margaret Reynolds on new book ‘The Wild Track: Adopting, mothering, belonging’

We caught up with our very own Margaret Reynolds to talk about her new Penguin book The Wild Track: Adopting, mothering, belonging.

Professor Reynolds has recently been featured in The Guardian and the Telegraph and has interviews with Talk Radio, Times Radio, Monocle Radio, about the book and her experiences of adoption and writing the book with her daughter Lucy.

Here’s what she could tell us…


Tell us about your new book ‘The Wild Track: Adopting, mothering, belonging’. How did it come about and what can readers expect?

I adopted my daughter 12 years ago when she was six. And from the first, I used to jot down things that happened to us, little stories about our lives together. Then two years ago I heard a couple of things that reminded me how hard adoption can be, how often (very sadly) it does not work out. But we were still here! So I wanted to encourage others, so show how amazing and important adoption can be in helping children – who necessarily have difficult beginnings – in going on to make a success of their lives.

How has it been working with your daughter on the book? What do you think the book has to say to mothers around the world?

I showed the original version of the book to someone who said ‘don’t you think Lucy should have a voice?’. And I knew he was right! Politically, ethically it is always right to listen to the voices of children. So I asked her to write some sections.  In fact, it was great doing this. We have talked a lot about our different experiences and about the things we share.

Mothers are all different. Always, everywhere. There is no such thing as one ‘motherhood’. But there might be overlaps, and there might illumination and there might be a shared understanding, a recognition and acceptance which could be a positive for both mothers and children.

What 3 books would you recommend to readers after reading your book of course?

Jacqueline Rose, Mothers: An Essay on Love and Cruelty, Rachel Cusk, A Life’s Work, Sarah Knott, Mother: An Unconventional History.

Are there any lockdown lifelines that have kept you going in the last year?

Growing vegetables, going for long walks with our dog, watching classic films, cooking, noticing the seasons, planning a long trip to remote Greek islands.

Call for Papers – Queen Mary PGRS Virtual Conference ‘Contagion: Spread the Word’

Queen Mary PGRS Virtual Conference:
Contagion: Spread the Word 12 July 2021

Keynote Speaker: Dr Elizabeth Outka (University of Richmond)
Due to the global pandemic, the word “contagion” may instantly inspire thoughts related to sickness or disease, but “contagion” has numerous metaphorical applications as well. William S. Burroughs in The Adding Machine (1986) states that:

“The Word is literally a virus, and that it has not been recognized as such because it has achieved a state of relatively stable symbiosis with its human host […]. The Word clearly bears the single identifying feature of virus: it is an organism with no internal function other than to replicate it-self.”


This one-day, interdisciplinary conference is organised by the English Department’s Postgraduate Research Seminar (PGRS) Committee at Queen Mary University of London: https://queenmaryenglish.wordpress.com/conferences/contagion-conference/.

We welcome proposals from graduate researchers in literature and related disciplines that ex-plore the theme of “contagion” across periods and genres.
We encourage broad interpretations of the theme.

  • Possible topics include but are not limited to:
  • Historical outbreaks of disease
  • Epidemiology literature
  • Legal developments regarding medicine and medical qualifications
  • Medical figures in history and literature
  • Sickness/disease as metaphor
  • Spread of literacy and knowledge vs censorship
  • Letters and postal systems, epistolary novels
  • Spread of literature through social media
  • Spread of (mis)information
  • Illness and prejudice
  • Imaginative contagion (e.g. the outbreak narrative, ‘zombie culture’, vampire fiction)
  • Bloodlines and the preoccupation with birth and class
  • Migration narratives and travel writing

A 250-word abstract and 50-word biography should be submitted to qmenglishpgrs@qmul.ac.uk by 1st May 2021.

English and Drama Newsletter – February 2021 Edition

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Quick updates from us:

RESEARCH SEMINARS:
4 Feb English Postgraduate Research Seminar: Nadia Atia

Representing Iraq from Afar: Muhsin al-Ramli’s Scattered Crumbs


18 Feb QUORUM Drama: Lola Olufemi  (Writer of Feminist Interrupted – picture from seminar flyer above left)
Imaginative-Revoluntionary Potential: how, what, where

VOTE ONLINE TO SUPPORT ALUMNA THEATRE SHOW: Fraciska Éry has been nominated for an award for her Hamlet production. Vote to help her win.

WHAT WE’RE READING: We’re publishing an LGBT+ History Month special of our new column What We’re Reading. Be sure to contribute by recommending a book.

THE POWER OF POETRY: Read poetry by our students as we are inspired to celebrate the medium after hearing Amanda Gorman’s powerful work.

STAY CONNECTED: Instagram / Twitter / Facebook / Youtube

Online Events

OFFER HOLDER INTERVIEW DAY
Sat 13 Feb, Online
We have our next opportunity in January for our 2021 entry offer holders to hear an overview of their course, meet a member of staff for an interview and do a taster session.
Email us for information

TASTERS FOR YEAR 12/13 STUDENTS & TEACHERS

We’ve just launched 2 new tasters on Sat 13 Feb:

Drama Year 12/13 Taster: Theatre & The Supernatural

English Yr 12/13 Taster: Contemporary Middle Eastern Writing

LISTINGS

Public Space and the Geography of Loneliness
4 Feb, Online Our very own Matthew Ingleby will speak on Public Space and the Geography of Loneliness is the first event in our series of The English Association’s special interest group on Loneliness and Technology.


PEACH Creative Workshop
9 Feb, Online

“In honour of #lgbtqhistorymonth, we have decided to theme our first creative workshop of 2021  on love! The prompts for this workshop will be shaped around the works of queer writers and artists, using their pieces as inspiration for creative creation”.

Diaspora Speaks – February Events
From 10 Feb, Online

Check out the Instagram for all the details

POETRY OPEN MIC NIGHT
10 Feb, Online

A night organised by our very own student Jasmine Rothon that is open to everyone – beginners and pros! Reading and performing original work and covers of poems we love. Do a reading or just watch.

Sign up here

Book Launch: The Network Turn: Changing Perspectives in the Humanities
on 11 Feb at 4pm GMT

Celebrate the launch of Ruth Ahnert’s co-authored book with a conversation hosted by Jo Guldi and Zoe le Blanc on Zoom.

You can register here

Chang and Eng and Me (And Me)
16 Feb, online
A short performance by PhD student Tobi Poster-Su for puppets in 3 acts followed by a post-show discussion.More information and tickets

Pathologies of Solitude Seminar Series
From 16 Feb, Online

The series continues online this term, with an exciting line up of speakers from literary scholars and historians to neuroscientists. The seminars take place on Tuesdays at 5pm (UK time). All are welcome but booking is required. You can see the full line-up of speakers here and register for attendance here.

Wasafiri Writing workshops

Wasafiri Writing Workshops
Various Dates from February-April 2021

Find out more here

News & Links

Alumni Profiles:

  • Lucy Dear (Drama BA, 2006), Applied Theatre Practitioner, Director and Community Producer.
  • Evie Lewis (English Literature MA), PhD Researcher.
  • Annabelle Sami (English Literature MA), Children’s Author.

Bechdel Theatre co-run by Drama graduate Pippa Sa has received Arts Council funding to help develop the pioneering platform from a 2-person passion-project into a sustainable, equitable company, supporting, amplifying & connecting women, trans & non-binary people who work in & care about theatre & live performance.

Desi Delicacies

Rosie Dastgir (English) has a short story in an anthology of fiction and non fiction and recipes called Desi Delicacies: Food Writing from Muslim South Asia – about south Asian Muslim foodways – edited by Professor Claire Chambers at York University and just published by Picador India.  Her story is called A Brief History of the Carrot – !

Figs in Wigs

Figs in Wigs (Drama alumni) publish a new printed version of their Little Wimmin through Salamander Street.

Buy it here

Postmil

Rachel Gregory Fox (English)’s co-edited book Post-Millennial Palestine – Literature, Memory, Resistance has been published by Oxford University Press.

Quest Radio and The Museum of London project saw two groups of QM students listening back to recordings of London in the past.

Very exciting news is that the group that explored recordings from London’s LGBTQ+ Club Scene is going to be included in Museum of London’s online content for LGBT History Month!

Students in the LGBT research group include Eve Bolton, Kirsten Johnson, Georgia Wood and Keir McEwan.

Afternoon Deelight

Martin O’Brien (Drama) is interviewed for Afternoon Deelight podcast  by Jordy Deelight. He says ‘it was brilliant to talk about Cystic Fibrosis and my work with someone else with it. We dig into early performance work in Poland, illness, Bob and Sheree, and survival.’

Listen here

Sunday Skool

Martin has just launched a project with Shabnam Shabazi and Joseph Morgan Schofield. It’s The Sunday Skool for Misfits, Experimenters, and Dissenters. It will be a free 12 week course, every Sunday for artists in the early part of their practice: The Sunday Skool – VSSL studio (vssl-studio.org)

Susheila Nasta (English/Wasafiri Magazine) will be one fo the judges for the David Cohen Prize for a full life’s work only awarded every two years. Fellow judges include: Hermione Lee (Chair), Reeta Chakrabarti (BBC), Peter Kemp (The Times lead fiction critic) and Maura Dooley (poet, Prof at Goldsmith’s, previous Director of Southbank Literature). Previous winners of this illustrious include: Edna O’Brien, Tom Stoppard, Harold Pinter, Hilary Mantel, David Holroyd, Julian Barnes, Tony Harrison, Seamus Heaney, VS Naipaul. Read more here

Matthew Rubery (English) writes about how maintaining a critical distance with books might not be around for long on Public Books:

“Scholars have been conditioned to respond to talk of likes and dislikes with embarrassment, if not outright contempt. But the facade of critical detachment may be on the way out,”

Read the article here

People’s Palace Projects (Based at QMUL) has been featured in a UKRI Impact Case Study here.

‘me’ by @poetinahijab – The Power of Poetry Series

📓 We’re excited to publish our first contribution from @poetinahijab called ‘me’. ⁠

📓@poetinahijab says Maya Angelou’s ‘phenomenal woman’ and ‘still i rise’ inspire most of their poems like this one. ⁠

📓 Inspired to create? Please do submit your work via sed-web@qmul.ac.uk whether it’s a poem you’ve written, poem you love or poet we should discover. ⁠

Careers Sessions for SED Students in Semester 2 – 2021

There’s some unmissable events coming up for you to get valuable insight and develop your confidence in these uncertain times.

  • Media & Creative Industries Summit

Thursday 28 January, 5.30 – 7pm

An online panel session of speakers in publishing, media and journalism, with the aim of helping students broaden their connections and knowledge within this field. Speakers – all alumni of SED – work at organisations including the BBC, Orion, Al Jazeera, and Sky.

Students can sign up for this event here: https://qmul.targetconnect.net/leap/event.html?id=7697&service=Careers+Service

  • Making the most of Semester B and finding opportunity in a challenging job market

Friday 29 January, 12-1pm

This is a talk exclusively for Humanities and Social Science students, particularly those not sure how to start or progress their career thinking and planning during Covid. This session will focus on the opportunities and events available right now to explore career options, make plans, and gain experience.

Students can sign up for this event here: https://qmul.targetconnect.net/leap/event.html?id=8073&service=Careers+Service

  • SED-exclusive workshop series in February

Tailored specifically to the SED cohort, this short series of three workshops aims to help students understand the skills they are gaining from their English and Drama degrees; make decisions about avenues they would like to explore and pursue; get an introduction to working for themselves (which may be of particular interest to those interested in a writing or arts career); and engage with ways of presenting themselves to prospective employers, connections, and clients.

They can find more information and sign up here:

Wednesday 3 February: SED Careers: Making choices: https://qmul.targetconnect.net/leap/event.html?id=7837&service=Careers+Service

Wednesday 10 February: SED Careers: Working for yourself: https://qmul.targetconnect.net/leap/event.html?id=7839&service=Careers+Service

Wednesday 17 February: SED Careers: Presenting yourself: https://qmul.targetconnect.net/leap/event.html?id=7841&service=Careers+Service

  • Humanities careers events in March

Starting off with online speed networking with QM Humanities alumni, this series of events aims to demonstrate to Humanities students the broad range of options available to them, and arm them with the knowledge and skills to allow them to follow their chosen path.

Further details are in PDF which you can download via the button below…

Don’t forget you can book careers appointments

Students can book appointments with Careers by calling 02078828533, and find resources, events and information on our website: https://www.qmul.ac.uk/careers.

English and Drama Newsletter – January 2021 Edition

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Happy New Year 2021


We wish you a safe and supported 2021. We’re here to help if you need us this year and would love to hear from you.

Quick updates from us:

UCAS DEADLINE EXTENSION: Undergraduate applicants for September 2021 entry now have until 29 January to apply. Watch our IG Live or ask a question.

7 DAY GRACE PERIOD: The School has agreed a 7-day grace period for all SED assignments due in January 2021. Details here

HOW TO CONTACT US:  Our physical office is currently closed but we are available to contact via these methods including live chat.

WASAFIRI MAGAZINE: Psst. exciting events are coming very soon so please do sign up to their newsletter via the link in the top right corner of the website.

STAY CONNECTED: Instagram / Twitter / Facebook / Youtube

Pictured: Wonderer Literary Journal, Romeo & Juliet featuring student Emily Redpath, Decolonising Sloane’s herbarium and our latest Instagram Live.

Online Events

OFFER HOLDER INTERVIEW DAY
Wednesday 20 January 2021

We have our next opportunity in January for our 2021 entry offer holders to hear an overview of their course, meet a member of staff for an interview and do a taster session.

Email us for information


POSTGRADUATE OPEN EVENTS

We have two online open events planned for the following courses:

MA English Literature – 3 Feb – 5-6pm UK Time
MSc Creative Arts and Mental Health – 3 Feb – 6.30-8pm UK Time

Sign up here to get invited

LISTINGS

Welcome to The Last Breath Society: Mortality, Care, and Solidarity in Zombie Time
Thursday 14 January 2021 6.30pm-8.15pm on Zoom

Our very own Martin O’Brien will talk about his practice and research in relation to ideas of care, community, and solidarity in times of illness. He will discuss his notion of Zombie Time, or the temporal experience of living on longer than expected, as a way of understanding mortality and chronic illness.

Get tickets

Power to the People – a digital festival by Phakama
Sunday 17 January 2021

Join Project Phakama (arts organisation based at QMUL) on Sunday 17th January 2021 for Project Phakama’s very first Digital Festival! To kick off Phakama’s 25th birthday celebrations they’ll be hosting a day’s festival called Power to the people, exploring the theme of ‘resistance‘.

Over the course of a day participants will come together to explore the things we are resisting. You’ll be able to choose from a range of workshops exploring movement, art therapy, creative writing and photography, sharing your ideas and building a small piece of performance to showcase to the group.Come along to revel in Phakama’s brilliant philosophy and people, feel inspired and explore something new.

Book a free ticket here

News & Links

Sloane Herbarium in the Natural History Museum, London
Portrait of Sir Hans Sloane in the Museum’s Historical Collections Room which holds Sloane’s herbarium (along the wall) and his Vegetable Substances (in the drawers). The latter are mostly botanical objects, numbered and sealed in decorative glass boxes. Sloane carefully catalogued where they came from, who had sent them to him and what they were used for.

AHRC LAHP Collaborative Doctoral Award: ‘Decolonising the Sloane Herbarium’

Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and the Natural History Museum (NHM) are pleased to announce the availability of a fully funded doctoral grant from October 2021.

This studentship is funded for 3.5 years full time (or part-time equivalent). The project will investigate provenance information for the botanical specimens in the Sloane Herbarium, a foundation collection of NHM, to re-imagine our understanding of its global and imperial dimensions.

Julie Rose Bower (Drama) has been commissioned by Victoria & Albert Museum to make ASMR videos. These will be released throughout this first quarter of 2021 and she hopes they will provide some stress relief deep in the cloister of the archive.

The last films were featured in Elephant magazine and described Julie Rose as one of the artists you need to know ‘carving out space to reflect on the world today’: https://elephant.art/these-are-the-artists-you-need-to-know-05042020/

Submissions are open

Feather Pen Submissions Open

Feather Pen Blog is a creative writing platform managed by SED student Aysel Dilara Kasap that welcomes any type of writing and writers from all backgrounds. Our mission is to offer a creative space for all writers and aspiring writers to unleash their creativity. We want to help fellow writers to share their work, in this age in which rejections are more common than acceptance.

We’re open for submissions for all of our categories which include fiction (short stories and scripts), poetry and lifestyle (includes most kinds of non-fiction from articles, book reviews, film reviews, personal blog entries to travel accounts to anything you want to share). We especially encourage submissions for the fiction section. We’re also open to discuss any column ideas. Send your submissions or pitches to featherpen-blog@hotmail.com.

Vanessa Damilola Macaulay (Drama) Photography and memory, ritual and writing come together in Vanessa Damilola Macaulay’s inquiry into racialised experiences of breath and breathlessness, from violent anti-blackness to Fanon’s revolution.

Read it here

Elliot Morsia (English Alumnus) has published a ground-breaking new study of D. H. Lawrence with Bloomsbury Academic  Exploring draft manuscripts, alternative texts and publishers’ typescripts, The Many Drafts of D. H. Lawrence reveals new insights into the writings and writing practices of one of the most important writers of the 20th century. Focusing on the most productive years of Lawrence’s writing life, between 1909 and 1926 – a time that saw the writing of major novels such as Women in Love and the controversial The Plumed Serpent, as well as his first major short story collection – this book is the first to apply analytical methods from the field of genetic criticism to the archives of this canonical modernist author.

The book unearths and re-evaluates a variety of themes including the body, selfhood, the sublime, trauma, death, depression, and endings, and includes original transcriptions as well as reproductions from the manuscripts themselves. By charting Lawrence’s writing processes, the book also highlights how the very distinction between ‘process’ and ‘product’ became a central theme in his work. 

Read more and order here
Follow Elliott on Twitter: @EMorsia

Nineteenth

Nineteenth-Century Religion, Literature and Society: Disbelief and New Beliefs, edited by Clare Stainthorp (a new Leverhulme ECF in the School of English and Drama) and Naomi Hetherington was published in December as part of a four-volume Routledge resource. The volume explores the transformation of the religious landscape of Britain and its imperial territories during the 1800s as shaped by Bible criticism, science, esotericism, comparative religion, and freethought. It introduces and makes accessible diverse primary sources, from novels and poetry to sermons and pamphlets.

Emily Redpath (Drama alumna) is starring in a socially distanced and cleverly filmed version Romeo & Juliet and highlighted by the Guardian’s Chris Wiegand.⁠

Read the article in the Guardian

Tudor Networks of Power Led by Ruth Ahnert (English).

Tudor Networks works in a similar way to platforms such as Google Maps. It offers to possibility for users to view almost 100 years of history from a macro perspective. Just like Google Maps might reveal streets that had never been mapped before, this platform reveals hidden histories and network connections that were previously unknown.

Read more

Martin Welton (Drama) writes the intro and edits the publication of the first of a two-part special issue of Ambianceson Staging Atmospheres co-edited with Chloé Déchery.

Read here

Wonderer

WONDERER (SED Student Run Literary Journal) has launched it’s first issue and includes incredible examples of our students’ workincluding work on consciousness and race, South African fiction, gender displacement and much more fascinating lockdown reading.

Read it online here

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Life as a Language Assistant in Valencia by Haleema Ali

In September 2019, I found myself doing something highly unusual. Instead of enrolling in a degree or frantically looking at graduate schemes and the like, I was boarding a plane that would whisk me away from the dreary throes of English weather, to those of sun-kissed Valencia.

Although I would miss the familiarity of rain and grey skies, of family and friends – I was unbearably excited.

The reason for my departure, though seemingly impulsive, was planned. I would be starting my placement as a Language Assistant with the British Council in a Valencian primary school. Like many other English students, I was exceedingly worried about those dreaded ‘next steps’ after graduation. Would I be lost in the sea of thousands of graduates, hoping to stay afloat in a competitive and constrictive climate?

I never imagined I would be one of those people that took a gap year or went abroad. I had loved studying Spanish at secondary school and decided to be spontaneous and throw myself into an environment that was unknown and exciting. It would turn out to be one of the best decisions I had ever made.

My primary school was located in a sleepy suburban town, by the name of La Cañada. Surrounded by luscious orange trees (a much-loved Valencian fruit), it was a train ride away from the city centre, where I was staying. My daily tasks consisted of organising and managing students from all year groups, and I would plan (what I hoped were) interesting speaking activities for pupils to get stuck into. The school were particularly invested in contemporary UK culture, and this led to eventful lessons on Christmas and Halloween, with games like ‘search for Santa’ and ‘pin the nose, eyes and mouth on the pumpkin’.

Some more memorable moments included seeing the pupils in heaps of laughter whilst playing charades or ‘mímica’. Day-to-day teaching was consistently different, which was challenging but also enjoyable, and I always returned home having learnt something new. The staff were unwaveringly kind – helping me secure accommodation and answering my unending questions. They never failed to put me at ease. I also became accustomed to eating lunch several hours later than I would normally and was introduced to scrumptious Valencian dishes, like paella and calabaza.

In my spare time, which fortunately I had a great deal of, I explored my surroundings and tried to cram in as many galleries, gardens, and other sights as I possibly could. Valencia truly had the best of everything – the city, the beach, and the countryside. My favourite discovery was the University of Valencia’s Botanical Garden, a lush and inviting place with plants both beautiful and brain-like. To my inner bookworm’s delight, I would catch glimpses of literary things everywhere. I saw Petrarch and Dante in museums I visited; the most exciting experience was happening upon Gulliver Park – a huge playground structure entirely modelled on Gulliver’s Travels! It might have been for children – but I had an amazing time!

I also learnt about the annual Falles festival that spectacularly ‘combines tradition, satire and art,’ and which Valencia is famous for. Though the cruel arrival of Coronavirus halted any formal festivities, including the celebratory bonfire, I was thankful for what I had learned from the teachers and from museum visits. I was lucky enough to be shown around the city by a very kind teacher, which led to enjoyable ventures such as visiting the Tasquita de la Estrecha (the narrowest building in Europe), scenic hikes in mountainous villages and the sampling of delicious turrón (nougat). My language skills also improved during these outings. The locals were friendly and accommodating, which allowed me to practise my Spanish freely. I found that my speaking skills developed significantly after several months.

I wholeheartedly recommend the assistantship – it has changed my life in so many unforgettable ways. I am reminded of acclaimed South Asian novelist Anita Desai’s thoughts on travelling: ‘wherever you go becomes a part of you somehow’. The remarkable experience I had as a Language Assistant will always be a part of me. I had an outstanding time teaching, and I will treasure my memories with the staff and students.

The experience has provided me with a fascinating window into Valencia’s enriched culture through visits to renowned sites and the knowledge of important festivals. It has also helped me hone an abundance of skills – resilience, communication, and adaptability. My journey has made me the person I am today and is something I will cherish forever.

¡Hasta luego!

Support for SED students: General, In-Crisis and Well-being

a) General QMUL Support

  1. Your Advisor: first point of contact for help with your university life. Book an appointment by email or via the scheduler on QMPlus (during the semester). If you don’t know who your advisor is find out here.
  2. SED Student Support & Admin Team: If you have a general question please email us, live chat with us or reach out in the following ways.
  3. Directors of Student Support: If you need an extra person to help outside of your advisor contact Bridget Escolme (Drama) and Alfred Hiatt(English).
  4. More Sources:

b) In-Crisis & Emergency Support

  1. Emergency numbers: 999 for life or death emergencies and 111 on your phone for urgent health advice. 020 7882 3333 if you need campus emergency team.
  2. Helplines: Samaritans (crisis phone/chat support), Student Minds (tailored mental health support for students) and search for your local council’s mental health support provision. Tower Hamlets for example has a 24 hours crisis line.
  3. Mental Health First Aiders: A full list is available here or call Rupert Dannreuther to talk directly or he can put you in touch with others.
  4. Talk it out: Reach out to friends, siblings, loved ones and your course mates.

c) Well Being Tips

  1. Sleep: Read the NHS How to get good sleep guide and the Sleep Council‘s resources.
  2. Connection: Be the one who reaches out and use real talk to discuss real things going on not just. You’d be surprised how many people respond well to this. There’s still time to join societies, contact old friends and meet new ones.
  3. Exercise: Use the Couch to 5k or other similar apps to get into a routine of exercise that can improve your mood. Move around when studying to different places at home and at university if you need study space.
  4. More Wellbeing Resouces:
    • Advice and Counselling: There’s an amazing section on the Emotional Wellbeing here.
    • Local NHS services including your GP can do social prescribing including arts, mindfulness and many other well-being activities.
    • Togetherall is the student mental health platform QMUL subscribes to. Use it to do a course or connect anonymously.

If you have any tips we should add please leave a comment below…

AHRC LAHP Collaborative Doctoral Award: ‘Decolonising the Sloane Herbarium’

Decolonising the Sloane Herbarium

Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and the Natural History Museum (NHM) are pleased to announce the availability of a fully funded doctoral grant from October 2021.

This studentship is funded for 3.5 years full time (or part-time equivalent). The project will investigate provenance information for the botanical specimens in the Sloane Herbarium, a foundation collection of NHM, to re-imagine our understanding of its global and imperial dimensions.

The successful candidate will combine archival research and special collections handling with digital methods for structuring humanities data in order to surface hidden histories within the Sloane Herbarium, not least by building a resource that supports future generations of scholars.

A full description of the project objectives and application process is available in the Further Particulars.

This studentship is funded through the AHRC’s Collaborative Doctoral Awards (CDA) scheme via the London Arts & Humanities Partnership (LAHP) of which QMUL is a member. The studentship includes a stipend at the Research Council UK Home / EU rate (£17,609 per annum in 2021/22) plus fees for 3.5 years. The awarded candidate will also be entitled to a £550 per annum stipend top-up. Studentships can be either full or part-time. As a LAHP student, the successful candidate will have full access to the LAHP Doctoral Training Partnership development activities and networking opportunities, joining a cohort of about 90 students per year.

CDA grants provide funding for doctoral students to work on a project in collaboration with an organisation outside higher education. They are intended to encourage and develop collaboration and partnerships and to provide opportunities for doctoral students to gain first-hand experience of work outside the university environment. They enhance the employment-related skills and training available to the research student during the course of the award. Collaborative Doctoral Awards are not only a route into academia but also provide hands-on work experience in the cultural sector and transferrable skills.

This project will be jointly supervised by Dr Richard Coulton (QMUL) and Dr Mark Carine (NHM), with further supervisory input from Professor Markman Ellis (QMUL) and Miranda Lowe (NHM). The student will be expected to spend time at both QMUL and NHM, as well as becoming part of the wider cohort of LAHP funded students across the capital.

We want to encourage the widest range of potential students to study for this Collaborative Doctoral Award and are committed to welcoming applicants from different backgrounds. Candidates may come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds (e.g. archaeology, anthropology, literary or cultural studies, history, heritage studies, natural history, history and philosophy of science, museum studies, archive and information studies). Some experience of historical collections handling and/or digital humanities will be of benefit.

Potential candidates are welcome to contact Dr Richard Coulton (r.x.coulton@qmul.ac.uk) and Dr Mark Carine (m.carine@nhm.ac.uk) before preparing an application.

The successful candidate will commence their PhD in October 2021. They will hold their doctoral training grant in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at Queen Mary University of London, and will work in partnership with the Natural History Museum.

Applications must be made in two phases:
Firstly to QMUL by 5pm on Friday 29 January 2021
Secondly to LAHP by 5pm on Friday 5 February 2021

You must complete the QMUL process first in order to include your QMUL application ID reference number on the LAHP CDA application form.

Interview date: TBC (late March / early April)

English and Drama Newsletter – December 2020 Edition

Happy Holidays and Good Riddance to 2020

A few quick-fire updates from us:

INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES – 3 DECEMBER: We are delighted to hear thatAccessibility Consultant, Journalist and Speaker, Emily Rose Yates (English BA, 2013), was recently listed among the Shaw Trust’s Power 100, an annual publication containing the 100 most influential disabled people in the UK. 

COLLEGE CLOSURE DAYS: Queen Mary is closed from 18 December 2020-4 January 2021. If you need support please get in touch before this starts.

SEMESTER 2 DATES: 25 January -16 April 2021 / Bank holidays: 2 and 5 April 2021.

STAY CONNECTED
: Instagram / Twitter / Facebook / Youtube

LEVERHULME & PhD DEADLINES: 2021 Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship scheme and PhD Studentships information on our website.

Online Events

STUDENT-RUN OPEN EVENING FOR 2021 APPLICANTS

campus

Friday 11 December 2020, 3.30 – 6.30pm (GMT)

You will also get the chance to take part in live subject panel sessions with current students, which will include a Q&A where you can ask questions about your subject of interest. The event will close with our semi-live digital tour, where you will be able to explore our Mile End campus and take part in a text Q&A session to find out more about living and studying at Queen Mary.

Book online


TASTER EVENT FOR YEAR 12/13 STUDENTS

Creative Writing Taster

Creative Writing Taster Session for Year 12-13 Students
9 Dec, 4-5pm – Free Online

RESEARCH SEMINAR

ENGLISH – POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH SEMINAR ‘Hear the sledges with the bells- Silver bells! What a world of merriment their melody foretells!’- Santa Poe Join the PGRS team on 10/12 for their PhD panel & ap-POE-priately festive Christmas Quiz! Sign up in teams of up to 4 now and watch here for more soon https://forms.gle/AtYYg3LJByYr1N


LISTINGS


‘Sh!t Actually’ is Backtually3-5 Dec – Rose Theatre and 12-23 at Home Manchester
QMUL Drama graduates Sh*t Theatre present their provocative and hilarious festive rework of Love Actually to prove ‘Love Actually is All Around’.

‘Best Alternative Christmas shows’ (Evening Standard).
‘No other alternative Christmas shows’ (Global Apocalypse)

Lived Religion and the Visual Arts: A Virtual Study Day4 Dec, Online, 2-4.30pm on ZoomA study day jointly hosted by the Centre for Religion and Literature in English (QMCRLE) and LERMA at Aix-Marseille Universitié.

Last Gasp WFH – Encore
6 Dec, Online – La Mama Experimental Theatre Club

Split Britches

Photo by Jingyu Lin for The New York Times

Written and performed by Peggy Shaw and Lois Weaver of Split Britches, it is a series of verbal and physical essays that playfully dances through the dangerous intersections of permanence and impermanence, interdependence and care, knowledge and experience, narcissism and echoes.

Book here

“not just one of the 40-year-old company’s best pieces, but among the most evocative art to emerge from the Covid era” –
Elisabeth Vincentelli, The New York Times

Rethinking Darkness Book Launch
10 Dec, Online, 3-5pm BST – Free
Our very own Martin Welton presents his work on Theatrical uses of darkness as part of this book launch.

WHAT MATTERS TO ME
10 Dec, Online, 5pm BST – Free Centring care and wellbeing in building online spaces.Prof. Pat Healy and Zoe Gumbs

Daniel Oliver

Daniel Oliver: Weird Séance
16 Dec, 7 & 9pm Cambridge Junction

A special IRL socially distanced performance of Weird Séance by our very own Daniel Oliver.

QMUL Seminar Series 2020-2021: Crowds, Affects, Cities
Dr Ben Gook (History, University of Melbourne):
Collectivity and Affect in Crisis Times: Dancing in Berlin, 1989-2020

16 Dec, Online, 8pm BST – Free

Join via Zoom: Meeting ID: 813 2218 1471 / Passcode: 203341

“The Fall of the Berlin Wall launched a wave of ecstatic raving and clubbing across Berlin. That wave’s force has carried the city’s clubbing scene right through to today—although it has met an unforeseen break in this year of Covid restrictions. For thirty years, the thump of bass has never gone so silent. In this paper, I’ll put my previous work on ecstasy and melancholy in Berlin around 1989 in dialogue with recent developments, as clubbers, DJs and producers contend with a moment in which collectives and crowds have become sites of anxiety. I’ll consider the attempts to replicate the clubbing experience online, as well as the irrepressible raving energies that have seen illegal parties take place against stringent public health measures.”

News & Links
Alumni Profiles this month: Emily Rose Yates
(English BA, 2013), Accessibility Consultant, Journalist & Speaker. Nathan Benitez (English BA), founder of afoodible.Creative Skills Academy: Rupert Dannreuther has run 3 online creative skills workshops and 2 in-person drop-ins for students, staff and friends. These will continue in semester 2 on Wednesday afternoons. Thanks to all who have attended so far.


Decolonise QMUL hosted an event for Black and Muslim students which featured Mohamed Mohamed from Black and Muslim in Britain (must-watch Youtube series), QMUL graduate Sawda On a Screen and poet Rakaya Esime Fetuga.

Diaspora Speaks

Diaspora Speaks has launched it’s first print issue showcasing work by students of colour. Co-founder Sawdah Bhaimiya (English BA) is interviewed here.

Pick it up from the Student Union Reception
Read the issue online

Hari Marini (Admin/Drama)’s performance company PartSuspended is in this #WIP online exhibition, curated by Queer Arts Projects which is on between 15 Oct 2020-15 Jan 2021.

See the exhibition

Michael McKinnie teaching drama in the Great Hall

Michael McKinnie (Drama) gave a helpful session for first year drama students in the grand surroundings of the Great Hall in the People’s Palace.

English and Drama Newsletter – November 2020 Edition

Remembering Catherine Silverstone

DR CATHERINE SILVERSTONE: Head of the School of English and Drama and a longstanding colleague in the Department of Drama at Queen Mary University of London, tragically passed away on Sunday 4th October 2020 at King’s College Hospital. Our thoughts are with her partner Julia, her family in New Zealand and her friends. We all loved and will miss Catherine more than we can ever say.
Read more and leave a message of remembrance

LOCKDOWN SUPPORT: We would like to remind students and staff that there is emotional support for you at the college from Mental Health First Aiders to counselling services.

Read about support for students and staff

A Season of Bangla Drama 2020

A SEASON OF BANGLA DRAMA: This year the biggest British-Bengali theatre goes online online with performances from east London as well as West Bengal, India and Sylhet Bangladesh.

See ‘A Season of Bangla Drama’ Programme

Online Events

TASTER EVENTS FOR YEAR 12/13 STUDENTS

taster

English Taster – Brave New Words: Writing Across Worlds with Wasafiri
23 Nov, 5-6.30pm – Free Online

Drama Taster – QM Futures: The Colored Museum & Writing Race
1 and 8 Dec, 5-7pm – Free Online

QMUL Creative Writing Taster Session for Year 12-13 Students
9 Dec, 4-5pm – Free Online

LISTINGS

HM Online 2020: Performance and Political Economy

6 Nov, Online, 3-5pm BST – Free
Our very own Shane Boyle and Martin Young are on the panel on performance and political economy.

English Peer Assisted Study Support (PASS)
11 Nov, Online, 3pm BST – Free
The next virtual English PASS drop-in session for First Year students takes place on Wednesday at 3pm (Week 8) via Blackboard Collaborate. Follow this link to access the module page and join the webinars: https://qmplus.qmul.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=13405. Week 8’s webinar is an open session – feel free to drop-in at any point to ask for any advice relating to your assignments or modules.

WHAT MATTER TO ME

WHAT MATTERS TO ME
11 Nov, Online, 5pm BST – Free Work and Utopia

Prof. Gerry Hanlon and Xavier De Sousa

Artists had been referred to by corporations as the ‘perfect worker’, finding enjoyment and drive in their work despite the often-long hours and low pay. Now we are moving to a world where we are being encouraged to retrain, up-skill and evolve. TAF have invited independent performance maker and curator Xavier de Sousa and Professor Gerard Hanlon from the Centre for Labour and Global Production at Queen Mary University of London to discuss, from their own viewpoints, the idea of WORK & UTOPIA. They will be working through ‘what matters’. To them, to you, and what we should be thinking about in building strategies for change in a post-COVID world.

Five Bodies

Five Bodies
12 Nov, Online, 6.30-8.30pm BST – Free
Inspired by moments of unknowingness, invention and imagination, Five Bodies brings together some of the most outstanding British and international poets including our very own Nisha Ramayya to share experiences of contemporary poetry.

Poetry vs Colonialism Series – Being Human Festival
14-22 Nov, Online – Free

Explore the histories of gold, sugar, cotton and tobacco with poets, artists, academics & museums. Join the online workshops to discover how poets can help decolonise the world.

Last Gasp WFH
21 Nov, Online – La Mama Experimental Theatre Club

Last Gasp WFH, looks for ways we might catch our breath in these times of global uncertainty, considering our ‘last acts’, whether personal, political or environmental.

Written and performed by Peggy Shaw and Lois Weaver of Split Britches, it is a series of verbal and physical essays that playfully dances through the dangerous intersections of permanence and impermanence, interdependence and care, knowledge and experience, narcissism and echoes.

News & Links

Alumni Profiles this month:

Pamela Clemit (English) talks to Simon Reid-Henry about William Godwin, and historical enquiry in the form of editing.

Read the 5 Questions Interview

Caleb Femi (English alumni) has published his book Poor to wide acclaim and coverage from many publications including the Guardian, Hay Festival and New Statesman.

Genna Gardini (Drama PhD)has received the 2020 CASA award to finish my play, Many Scars.

She says: ‘I’ve been working on this thing for the past two years &it’s one of the biggest endeavours of my life – to write a play about MS that is just as strange as this disease is. Thank you, CASA! ‘

Huw Marsh (English)has his essay‘Burley Cross Postbox Theft’ as Comedy is featured in Nicola Barker: Critical Essays

Scott McCracken (English)’s edits The Oxford Edition of the Works of Dorothy Richardson, Volume IV

Cecilia Muratori (Research Fellow) is featured on History of Philosophy Books in 3 minutes with her book Renaissance Vegetarianism: The Philosophical Afterlives of Porphyry’s On Abstinence.


Rodent (Drama alum) appeared at the online, inclusive and outrageous Queer House Party on 30 October.

Morag Shiach (English) has published A ‘SECTOR DEAL’ AND A CREATIVE PRECARIAT : Shaping creative economy policy in the UK since 2010.

21 Reasons Why You Should Apply to Queen Mary to study English and Drama before the UCAS Deadline

We understand that this year is very strange and confusing time for you – but we want to outline why applying to QMUL is a positive way to end 2020 with a plan.

Here are 21 reasons why you should apply to our English and Drama courses for 2021 entry before the UCAS deadline in January.


a) Why apply now?

1. You can relax and have stress-free holidays without worrying about your university choices. More Netflix time!

Pose (Dominique Jackson and cast) on Netflix
Pose (Dominique Jackson and cast) on Netflix

2. You’ll get invited to interview for all of our courses, to help you understand whether the course is right for you and to ask questions.

3. Quicker offer (usually): Your application will be processed ahead of people who apply later.

b) Why English at Queen Mary?

4. Our values of inclusion and actually decolonising the curriculum are at the heart of what we teach.

5. Professional Support & Work Experience: Employability is at the heart of our English courses and you will gain access to more areas of employment by choosing us.

6. Student Support: We’re here to support your learning the whole way through your degree, with a dedicated advisor, peer-assisted study support, writing workshops and professional practice classes.

c) Why Drama at Queen Mary?

7. Freedom to be you: Unlike Drama schools we support your to tell your own story.

8. Teaching that pushes the boundaries.

9. Space to create: We have 3 rehearsal rooms, 2 studio theatres, and a dedicated technical team to make your ideas a reality.

d) Why Queen Mary over other Russell Group universities?

10. Our history of fighting for social change and inclusion: Listen to this podcast – featuring our very own Nadia Valman – to get insight into this unique history.

East London College (now the Queens’ Building), 1900 © QMUL Archives

11. Our support services & student union.

We are dedicated to supporting students with services like counselling, writing support, Mental Health First Aid and more.

12. Our diversity – and how you can make friends with people from around the world and from different socio-economic backgrounds.

e) Why choose to study in 2021?

13. Learn in lockdown and its aftermath.

Make the most of lockdown and beyond and learn something interesting with us. You can always choose to add a year abroad in your third year when hopefully travel will be less restricted.

14. Time to reflect.

University gives you time to reflect on the wider world, develop your values and try to change the world.

15. The experience of blended learning is benefiting students.

We work with students to improve our online and in-person teaching as much as we can. Lots of students have told us that some experiences work better online. Activities like meeting an advisor or participating in a text-based English class work really well online, so we will act on this feedback for 2021.

neon signage
Photo by Ivan Bertolazzi on Pexels.com

f) Why choose to go to university rather than other options?

16. Transferable skills.

You’ll have time to perfect your transferable skills, including writing, teamwork and creating your own projects.

muslim female freelancer typing on laptop during coffee break
Photo by Ekaterina Bolovtsova on Pexels.com

17. Time for self-development.

You will have time outside of paid-work and time for internships and other opportunities that may be difficult to fit in around full time work or apprenticeships.

18. Meet curious people and make friends for life.

Lots of our students make friends for life on our courses. We are a friendly department and encourage students to talk and socialise outside of the workshop room.

g) Why do a humanities degree at all?

19. Humanities make us human – we need stories, critique and communication to challenge and celebrate the world we live in.

20. Humanities are relevant to so many careers and make you adaptable for jobs that don’t even exist yet.

21. You’ll find it easier to commit to, read and study about something you are passionate about.

3 Things Still to Do in Black History Month

1. Diaspora Speaks and PEACH Magazine are excited to present: On Black Voices! – 22 October

2. Ankhi Mukherjee is talking about Nigerian American writer and photographer Teju Cole for our Lisa Jardine Annual English Lecture – 22 October

3. Prof Susheila Nasta MBE is in conversation with Helen Thomas

Professor Susheila Nasta MBE and Dr Helen Thomas will discuss their long histories within the world of black writing and publishing.

The event will celebrate the publication of a free e-book: Black Agents Provocateurs – 250 Years of Black British Writing, History and the Law, 1770-2020 written by Helen Thomas and also the publication of the first Cambridge History of Black and Asian British Writing, edited by Susheila Nasta and Mark Stein.

They will discuss questions around:

  • the politics of publishing and editing
  • how they created their books
  • shifting definitions of black British writing
  • he importance of decolonising the school and university curricula