SED Opportunity Digest – 10 June 2023 – Concise Version

If you get to the end and apply for an opportunity please let us know and we’ll give you a freebie.

Please let us know if you have any suggestions for the next edition via sed-web@qmul.ac.uk

Don’t forget your careers service is open all year round and can help with finding jobs, making great applications and becoming more confident in interviews. Book an appointment or email your careers consultant Fliss Bush

Free events you should make the most of the summer with this weekend:

Queer & Now – A free entry (just turn up) festival at Tate Britain including a queer marketplace, performances and talks.

River Stage – the Glory Takeover – Drag and camp classics for free on the Southbank outside the National Theatre

From QMUL, Partners & Friends

Peopling the Palaces must end Sunday 11 June!

Peopling the Palaces is back from 3-11 June with performances, talks, screenings, socials and workshops. All for free. Everyone is welcome.

Still to come:

Fragility, Festivals, Funding and other F- words in Live Art

Nando Messias / TransMission: Sissy TV

Ascension by Shaun Caton

Outside QMUL

Are you passionate about helping those experiencing homelessness? 

Don’t miss our upcoming career fair for the homelessness service sector in a month’s time, organised by Greater London Authority, London Councils, HomelessLink, Bloomberg Associates and Department for Work and Pensions (DWP):  Date: Monday 10 July Location: Boxpark, Wembley, HA9 0JTTime: 10am–3pm 

There will be 30+ homelessness organisations, health partners and local authorities with current vacancies in the homelessness sector. Attendees can learn more about a career in the homelessness and rough sleeping sector, meet with employers and learn about specific opportunities on offer. The career fair is open to the public, but pre-registration is strongly encouraged. Register now to attend and learn about these organisations and their current vacancies:

Register Today

STEP – 12-month paid traineeship for young East Londoners wanting to step into careers in the creative & cultural sectors

This summer, our Shared Training and Employment Programme STEP returns for its 8th iteration as the previously annual paid traineeship getting young East Londoners into local creative jobs will take place more frequently – increasing employment opportunities for young East Londoners aged 18-30 brimming with new ideas, creative energy and timely perspectives – as they’re matched with our committed and every growing partner employers.

  • Museums & Galleries
  • Film, Music, TV, Radio, Broadcast & Production
  • Advertising, PR, Marketing, Print Media & Publishing
  • Theatre & Dance

Find out more and apply

Journalism Hub is packed with resources

You will find information about workshops, work experiences, newsletters, awards, mentoring schemes, funds, networking opportunities, toolkits and more!

See the resources

OPPORTUNITY: Roundhouse workshops

Develop your skills and network in filmmaking, podcasting and media production with the Roundhouses’ captivating workshops.

Dates: 2 June – 10 July

Find out more

How do institutions choreograph us?

ICA, Tuesday 20 June, 1-5.30pm

Booking link: https://www.ica.art/learning/how-do-institutions-choreograph-us 

How is visitors’ movement choreographed while visiting a museum or gallery? And what choreographies go on in the office, the box office, or the street outside? Join us for an afternoon to think through these questions collaboratively, with artists and art professionals’ presentations, collective discussions, and an option to take part in a spatial game, a movement workshop or a guided walk.

The Scheme – Penguin Trainee Scheme

Make your mark by spending six months between Sept 23- March 24 working with the best at the leading UK publisher. You’ll immerse yourself within one of our business areas, geared up to support you as you make decisions for yourself and contribute to our shared mission to make books for everyone.

Apply before 21 June

Decolonizing Sonic Heritage Spaces – Knowledge Exchange Workshop

Monday 19th June 2023, 9.15am to 5.15pm

Department of Performing Arts, City, University of London.

Room AG09, College Building, St John Street, London ECC1V 0HB.

This HEIF-supported knowledge exchange event will bring together curators, heritage professionals, sound artists and scholars to explore sound as a form of public engagement, learning, and critique in heritage spaces, with a focus on centring previously marginalised stories and voices.

All welcome! This will be an in person event.

Advance registration is requested for catering purposes: https://www.city.ac.uk/news-and-events/events/2023/june/decolonizing-sonic-heritage-spaces-a-heif-funded-knowledge-exchange-workshop

Masterclass: Getting The Most Out Of Interviewees & Asking The Right Questions

Book here

Jobs and Opps Closing Soon

See all Queen Mary jobs

Sign up to these for interesting events, opportunities and jobs are…

Apples & Snakes Artists Newsletter | Arts Admin E-Digest | ArtsJobs | BBC Academy | Creative Access (Jobs) | Creative Lives in Progress | Creative Mentor Network | ERIC – Career + Opportunities App | Film London | IlikeNetworking | JournoResources | Lectures.London | MediaBeans (media jobs) | QMUL Careers | Presspad | Run the Check | ScreenSkills | Society of Young Publishers | Startup Jobs | Tower Hamlets Arts | Write at Home (freelance writing opps)



Peopling the Palace(s) Festival 2023 – Full Schedule

Peopling the Palace(s) Festival 2023 Schedule

Saturday 3 June – Sunday 11 June 2023

Queen Mary University of London

Free tickets to all events here: bit.ly/peoplesthepalaces2023

Peopling the Palace(s) Festival invites you to connect with academics, artists, students, and alumni in 9 full days of performances, films, conferences, exhibitions, conversations & fun. 

Saturday 3 June

19:00

First Flights: Clear the Runway, a curated platform of QMUL graduate performances

Sunday 4 June­­­­­­­­

19:00

Sunday Night Special an informal salon for talking, showing and sharing any old or new ideas and projects with QM alumni and friends    

Monday 5 June

11:00 (in person) 14:00 (online)

Creative Skills Academy: Online Journalism, workshop with Ru Dannreuther

14:30

What the F*** am I doing with my Life?

15:00

Writing with other-than-humans, a workshop with QMUL Alumni, Rosa Postlewaite

16:00 and 18:45 

Moonface, a new solo performance by QMUL alumni Meg Hodgson followed by a Long Table on Intergalactic Colonisation at 19:30

Tuesday 6 June

14:00-16:00

A Public Studio on Neurological Disease Prevention and Risk Assessment, a conversation that uses the designer’s studio as a format for creative problem-solving with Dr Ruth Dobson, a consultant neurologist, and Dr Alison Thomson, a design researcher from the Preventive Neurology Unit at the Wolfson Institute

16:30- 18:30

Feeling Places, a participatory research collaboration with Departments of Drama, Film, Geography, and young people from local schools to explore the psychogeography of the university

19:00

Through the Diaspora: Through the Diaspora: PtP Film Festival,  2 screenings followed by Q&As with the film makers

11:00 

Kiki Tianqi Yu’s Nest, a documentary that follows the life of Fang Junrui, who encounters relentless obstacles in his pursuit of a job.

19:00

Yasmin Fedda’s Ayouni, a film searching for answers about loved ones, who are among the over 100,000 forcibly disappeared in Syria.

Wednesday 7 June

9:30-13:00 (Exhibition runs to 18:00)

Women/Theatre/Justice, a sharing of findings from the Women/Theatre/Justice research project with and about Clean Break Theatre Company that includes a long table, an exhibition, and film screenings.

19:00

All Hands on Deck, a vinyl DJ workshop with SuperSevens. No experience necessary.

20:00-23:00

After Hours Performance Club, inclusive queer performance night that celebrates diversity and empowers emerging LGBTQIA+ artists

Thursday 8 June

14:00

Long Table on Care and Solidarity, a long table on care and how it can risk individualising responsibility and eroding our commitment to social welfare. Table quests include Dr Jaswinder Blackwell-Pal, Professor Jen Harvie and Niall Morrissey.

19:30

Rosemary Lee-Moving Worlds-Dance on Film, a special screening celebrating Rosemary Lee’s unique contribution to dance film making over the last thirty years

Friday-Saturday 9-10 June (10 June online)

9:00-18:00

Mad Hearts: Queering Boundaries, a conference and festival on Arts and Mental Health

Friday 9 June

13:00 Online

Blind Date with Maya Rao & Lois Weaver, two feminist performers from New York and New Delhi, making art for almost half a century in their own corners of the world, meet each other for the first time for a blind date

20:00

Jelly Live, live performance of the new album by Andrew Poppy

Saturday 10 June  A Day of Live Art

13:30- 17:00

Fragility, Festivals, Funding, and other F- words in Live Art, a long table and break-out sessions withfestival artists, directors, curators, and friends of Live Art

18:00

TransMission: SissyTV, a showing of a new performance by Nando Messias

19:00

Ascension, a new performance by Shaun Caton followed by a Live Art Social

Sunday 11 June

16:00-18:00

People’s Palace Projects book launch: RE-IMAGINING SHAKESPEARE EDUCATION,  a launch of the book and a celebration Catherine Silverstone’s contribution to the chapter and a toast to her community as it brings this 2023 Peopling the Palaces festival to a close.

The Peopling the Palace(s) is curated by Lois Weaver and produced collaboratively by Drama at QMUL and Air Supply, QMUL’s platform for arts graduates.

SED Opportunity Digest – 30 May 2023 – Concise Version

If you get to the end and apply for an opportunity please let us know and we’ll give you a freebie.

Please let us know if you have any suggestions for the next edition via sed-web@qmul.ac.uk

Don’t forget your careers service is open all year round and can help with finding jobs, making great applications and becoming more confident in interviews. Book an appointment or email your careers consultant Fliss Bush

From QMUL, Partners & Friends

Peopling the Palaces starts this Saturday 3 June

Peopling the Palaces is back from 3-11 June with performances, talks, screenings, socials and workshops. Al for free. Everyone is welcome.

Book now for these incredible events:

6 June: A Public Studio on Neurological Disease Prevention and Risk Assessment

Sita Balani – Deadly and Slick: Sexual Modernity and the Making of Race (online launch) – 31 May

Published by Verso, Balani’s first book, “Deadly and Slick”, attempts to understand the making of racial categories. The trickery of race comes down to how it is embedded in everyday life through the domain we take to be most intimate and essential: sexuality.

Book here

Mad Hearts: the Arts and Mental Health – Queering Boundaries

This two-day event explores productive, radical, contemporary encounters between the arts and mental health, bringing together clinical, artistic and research perspectives that offer a re-interpretation of contemporary mental health science and practice.

Book now

Windrush 75 Events

  • Windrush 75 Festival at Bernie Grant Arts Centre a week-long programme of film, live music, art exhibitions & Caribbean/African food. Tickets from £5 | FREE for U2s / O65s: http://ow.ly/gP5g50OpXNa

Are you keen to support first years in your School succeed in their study whilst gaining beneficial and evidential employability skills? The PASS mentoring programme can help you do just that!

PASS is a subject-based mentoring scheme, run for first-year students by higher-year undergraduates. PASS is an internationally renowned programme and very well recognised by employers and other universities. Students who work on PASS gain extensive experience in organisation, team management, publicity and most of all clear and tailored communication. This is also a fantastic opportunity to make a positive impact on a new students first year experience at QMUL and share your passion about your subject area.

PASS Mentors are voluntary positions open to students commencing 2nd and 3rd year undergraduate studies. Whilst the position is voluntary, a £40 bursary is available annually for those who complete training and undertake the required number of sessions. This role gives great exposure to team work, communication and organisational skills.

PASS Student organisers is a paid position and is open to students commencing 2nd and 3rd years undergraduate studies too. This position is a paid position and requires further commitment. This role gives great exposure to team leadership and organisational skills.  

  • The PASS programme is now recruiting for next years cohort of mentors (voluntary) and Organisers (paid), further information on the scheme can be found here
  • The PASS mentor application form can be found here
  • The PASS Student Organiser application form can be found here
  • Or alternatively, please do get in touch with the PASS Coordinator, Fathea Khanum on f.khanum@qmul.ac.uk with any questions you may have.

We look forward to welcoming you on to the PASS Team.

Sophia Thakur With Lemara Lindsay-Prince (#Merky Books): In Conversation – 14 June

A deep-dive into spoken word, poetry and the publishing industries.

Book here

QMUL Centre for 19C & Legacies: ‘Legacies and Liabilities? Decolonial, Interdisciplinary, and Intersectional Approaches to the Nineteenth Century Now’

Interactive Soup @ Theatre Deli Leadenhall – 13 June 2023

Interactive Soup is a social event, dinner, and miniature funding platform all-in-one, where those in interactive performance get to meet, talk, eat, and support each other!

Book here

Weirdness Salon

3 June 12.30 – 6pm
East15 Acting School, Corbett Theatre – Loughton

  • Keynote: Professor Dimitris Papanikolaou on Contagious Weirdness, University of Oxford
  • Adam Alston (Goldsmiths, University of London) in conversation with Julia Bardsley (Queen Mary University of London)
  • Phoebe Patey-Ferguson (Rose Bruford College) in conversation with Tammy Reynolds aka Midgitte Bardot
  • Tara Fatehi in conversation with Hamja Ahsan (Shy Radicals) and Greg Wohead
  • Eirini Kartsaki (East15 Acting School, University of Essex) in conversation with Malik Nashad Sharpe aka Marikiscrycrycry
  • Hosted by Eirini Kartsaki

Book here

Outside QMUL

Upgrade Yourself Festival at Somerset House – Free Killer Creative Careers Advice on 2 & 3 June

Connecting aspiring and emerging creatives under 30 access to trailblazing creatives and industry experts via talks, workshops and mentoring sessions including:

Stef Sword-Williams (F*ck Being Humble) – Self Promotion and Networking Masterclass
Montana Hall (Run the Check) – In Conversation: How to Run the Check
Gina Tonic (Polyester Zine) – Pitching Your Work to Creative Publications
Montana Hall (Run the Check) – In Conversation: How to Run the Check
Asher Glean – Content Creation 101
School of Bop Panel – Spinning Many Plates and Alternative Creative Pathways

Book now

Undomesticated – Gender Defiance in the Home 

A series of film screenings, food and facilitated discussion taking a queer twist on the traditional Movie Night at home

Book here

Decode seeks Freelance Relationship Managers

Two freelance relationship managers to join the team supporting disabled creatives to apply to access to work.  Closing – 12 Jun Location – Remote (UK) ££ – £25 per hour

Book now

Book ahead: Isabel Waidner Book Launch at London Review Bookshop

Isabel Waidner (QMUL) will be at the shop to read from and discuss their latest novel Corey Fah Does Social Mobility (Hamish Hamilton), and will be in conversation with academic, performer and activist Diarmuid Hester, whose forthcoming book Nothing Ever Just Disappears Waidner has described as ‘insightful, delightful, and enlightening: an essential entrant into the queer canon.’

Book now

Newham Word Festival

Newham Word Festival features free poetry & storytelling events, authors discussing their books, visual arts, debates, performances and lots more.

Book now

Paid 6-month Scheme traineeship open from 7-28 June 2023

If you identify as being from a lower socio-economic background or are Black, Asian, or from a Minority Ethnic group you should apply…

Book now

OV Theatre Makers – Scheme – Apply before 19 June 2023

The training programme includes: 

– A launch event 
– 14 masterclass sessions led by OV Theatre Makers Director Joseph Hancock and guest practitioners from a range of theatre disciplines
– A scratch night showcasing participants’ work at a professional theatre venue
– Tickets to two Old Vic productions 
– A theatre ticket allowance for other venues 

This six-month programme will run from Sep 2023–Feb 2024.

Book now

Migration: a public history festival, May to July 2023

Walks, exhibitions, creative workshops, screenings, talks, online events, food, and more.

2 July, 11am-1pm: Remembering Rosemary Lane: a guided walk and talk on Irish migrant life in Victorian Whitechapel, Whitechapel.

4 July, 6pmAt the Heart of the Nation: Migration and the NHS, Royal College of Nursing, 20 Cavendish Sq, London, W1G 0RN.

See event details and book here  (www.bbk.ac.uk/research/centres/raphael-samuel-history-centre/public-history-festivals)

Jobs and Opps Closing Soon

See all Queen Mary jobs

Sign up to these for interesting events, opportunities and jobs are…

Apples & Snakes Artists Newsletter | Arts Admin E-Digest | ArtsJobs | BBC Academy | Creative Access (Jobs) | Creative Lives in Progress | Creative Mentor Network | ERIC – Career + Opportunities App | Film London | IlikeNetworking | JournoResources | Lectures.London | MediaBeans (media jobs) | QMUL Careers | Presspad | Run the Check | ScreenSkills | Society of Young Publishers | Startup Jobs | Tower Hamlets Arts | Write at Home (freelance writing opps)



SED Tote Bag & Merch Competition 2023

Our annual design competition is back and we’re looking for a new design for our 2023 tote bag and other merch, which we give away at open days, events like graduation and to new students joining the School. You have until 5 June to enter your work!

It’s time to get arty and inspire the next generation of SED students.

What we’re looking for

  • Inspiring quotes, imagery and designs that merge the worlds of literature, drama and creative writing.
  • No bigger than A5 size (or shrinkable to this size)

How to enter

To enter send your design as a black line based PDF, JPG, PNG or EPS file to sed-web@qmul.ac.uk.

To enter you must be a School of English student, staff member or one of our alumni.

What you’ll win

If you win:

  • Your bag will be put into production for our 2023 open days and events.
  • You’ll also win a £50 LovetoShop voucher.

Competition closes: Monday 5 June at midday. A vote by our SED staff team will choose the winning design.

For inspiration here are our winners of our 2022 tote bag competition, which we give away at open days, events and to new students incoming to the School.

The first people to get the bags will be our graduating students in July 2023.

SED Opportunity Digest – 13 May 2023 – Concise Version

If you get to the end and apply for an opportunity please let us know and we’ll give you a freebie.

Please let us know if you have any suggestions for the next edition via sed-web@qmul.ac.uk

Don’t forget your careers service is open all year round and can help with finding jobs, applications and interviews. Book an appointment or email your careers consultant Fliss Bush

From QMUL, Partners & Friends

Staging Decadence: Dress to Kill

24th May 2023 – 17:00 – 19:30

(Doors will open at 17:00 to explore the space, films and exhibition, the performances and discussion will begin at 18:00)

In person at Queen Mary University of London, Film and Drama Studio, Arts 2 Building, Mile End Road, Bethnal Green, London, E1 4PA.

Online via Zoom.

Book in person tickets here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/staging-decadence-dress-to-kill-tickets-629136021777?aff=ebdsoporgprofile

Book online tickets here: 
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/staging-decadence-dress-to-kill-online-tickets-629139371797?aff=erelpanelorg

Poster design by Tara Fatehi.

Unmissable SED Careers Event on 22 May with Faber & Faber, The Guardian, Camden People’s Theatre and Arts Council

More info

Book now

Book event: From Sylhet to Spitalfields by Shabna Begum – 19/5, 7pm

Using oral history interviews and archival research, From Sylhet to Spitalfields looks at the Bengali community’s contribution to this little-known episode of East End history, and how it can inform present-day housing struggles.

Shabna Begum is Head of Research at the Runnymede Trust, the UK’s leading race equality think tank.

Jumanah Younis is books editor at Lawrence Wishart and a trainee therapist.

Become a Buddy Scheme Mentor

Find out more

People’s Palace Projects at Queen Mary University of London, in partnership with the ICA, are proud to present the second edition of ECHOES Indigenous Film Festival.

19-21 May 2023 

Featuring 18 thought-provoking works from 21 filmmakers, representing 13 ethnic groups across 10 regions in Brazil and neighbouring countries Bolivia, Peru, Colombia, and Argentina. Almost three-quarters of the featured filmmakers are women. 

Book here

Raphael Samuel Memorial Lecture 2023Walking Against the Expulsive Environment: Refugee Tales and the Politics of WelcomeProfessor David Herd

Monday 12 June, 6.00pm followed by a reception

Peston Lecture Theatre, Graduate Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS

All welcome; registration essential. 

Book here

This event is part of Migration: a public history festival, a series of lectures, exhibitions, workshops and walks around London supported by the Raphael Samuel History Centre

A DAY WITH MICHÈLE BARRETT

Fri, 19 May 2023 09:30am

School of English and Drama

This event brings together a range of scholars to reflect on Professor Barrett’s pioneering interdisciplinary research and celebrate her major contributions to literary studies, feminist theory and the history of the First World War. 

Peston Lecture Theatre, Graduate Centre, Mile End Campus.

Read more

Hunker in Your Bunker: Doomsday Prepping in the United States
School of Politics and International Relations

In the middle of the 20th century, the United States asked people to build domestic fallout shelters in case of nuclear war. But the US never had to use these bunkers for their intended purpose. This led to the phenomenon of “bunkerization,” where people started thinking of their homes as bunker spaces. This talk explores the political implications of this trend. Wed, 24 May 2023 5:30pm, The Hitchcock Theatre, Arts One Building, Room G.19,  Mile End Campus. 

Read more

 Creativity and Wellbeing Week 2023 – 15-21 May

  • Tuesday 16th May: NCCH APPG roundtable exploring Leadership and Strategy (Free, online) BOOK NOW
  • Tuesday 16th May: Creativity in a health crisis: What does the research tell us? (Free, online) BOOK NOW
  • Tuesday 16th May: Arts & Health Hub present: The Value of Lived Experience (Free, online) BOOK NOW
  • Wednesday 17th May: Creative Health Sandpit, big London meet-up (Free, at City Hall) BOOK NOW
  • Thursday 18th May: How to establish a Creative Health City Region, perspectives from Manchester (Free, online) BOOK NOW
  • Friday 19th May: Creativity and Dementia (Free, online) BOOK NOW
  • Friday 19th May: Writing for Wellbeing. BOOK NOW
  • Friday 19th May: Launch of the ‘Queering Creative Health’ report (Free, in-person at QUEERCIRCLE) BOOK NOW
  • Saturday 20th May: Arts and Health Hub present: Crystallised Intelligence, Long Covid. BOOK NOW
  • Sunday 21st May: Arts and Health Hub present: Crystallised Intelligence: GUTS! BOOK NOW

Worldmaking in Languages, Literatures and Cultures

Book tickets

Outside QMUL

Free online workshop: Career Planning for Screen Industries

Mon 15 May | Zoom

Join us online to learn how best to begin planning your career in the screen industries. Industry expert Sue Russo will talk about where to look for work and the different routes in, shining a light on the networks that you should be a part of. Free to attend.

Book now

THE GALLERY – AN INTERACTIVE FILM + DIRECTOR Q&A AT GENESIS CINEMA

Book here

Facet Launch at Alumni run Live Art Space in South London

Image courtesy of June Lam.

RSVP to the inaugural FACET launch event

FACET is an innovative nine-month project, presented by VSSL Studio in partnership with Arts Council England, designed to centre and elevate queer people and art. From May 2023 to January 2024, VSSL Studio will collaborate with five contemporary visual artists to co-produce a series of five exhibitions, exploring the ever-evolving and myriad spectrum of contemporary queer expression.

Journalism Workshop: Using Social Media Effectively To Find & Promote Your Stories -Carla Jenkins

In a follow-up to our popular social media series, Carla Jenkins will run through:

  • The current social media landscape and which platforms work best for journalists finding stories or promoting work,
  • How to identify trends and emerging stories on social media,
  • Finding interviewees on social media, and best practices for approaching them,
  • How to drive engagement with your published work and grow an audience.

Book here

Judy’s Vintage Fairs at The Mile End Pavilions

Judy's Vintage Fairs and Kilo Sale at The Pavilions

After their successful debut in February, we welcome Judy’s Vintage Fairs back to the Pavilions in Mile End Park. Shop affordable, vintage, handmade and reworked at carefully curated marketplaces.

Judy’s Vintage Market at The Ecology Pavilion on 14 May

From vintage fashion and homewares to handmade jewellery and lifestyle products – unique ideas cross paths with a sustainable ideology, small-batch and preloved.

The Vintage Furniture Flea at The Art Pavilion on 14 May

Voted ‘Best Fair’ by the Vintage Guide to London. Doing away with expensive replicas and focusing on quality and affordability, the Flea provides an antidote; a celebration of mid-century living from the 50s and beyond, the event offers up top vintage traders, all offering furniture and homewares without costing the earth. 

One ticket for 14 May gets you into the events at both pavilions.

Genesis Cinema Birthday £2.50 Screenings

Book here

BFI NETWORK Short Film Fund

The BFI NETWORK England short film funding is now open! Applications for amounts from £5,000 up to a maximum of £25,000, of any length up to a maximum of 15 minutes, can be made.

Deadline: Tuesday 23 May

Essential Magazine for those wanting to get into Publishing

image

Issue 71 is here! Follow the link to read, or click here to read articles via our website! 

Read the issue

International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia Event on May 17th 2023 

Wednesday 17th May – 7.00 – 8.30pm – St Margaret’s House, The Mulberry Hall, 21 Old Ford Road, E2 9PL – Free

There will be SHORT FILM SCREENINGS followed by a PANEL DISCUSSION with speakers from:

  • Human Dignity Trust
  • Micro Rainbow
  • House of Rainbow

Please book your free ticket by noon 16th May here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/623502933057

Jobs and Opps Closing Soon

See all Queen Mary jobs

Updated: Further sources of interesting events, opportunities and jobs are…

Apples & Snakes Artists Newsletter | Arts Admin E-Digest | ArtsJobs | BBC Academy | Creative Access (Jobs) | Creative Lives in Progress | Creative Mentor Network | ERIC – Career + Opportunities App | Film London | IlikeNetworking | JournoResources | Lectures.London | MediaBeans (media jobs) | QMUL Careers | Presspad | Run the Check | ScreenSkills | Society of Young Publishers | Startup Jobs | Tower Hamlets Arts | Write at Home (freelance writing opps)



Unmissable SED Careers Event on 22 May with Faber & Faber, The Guardian, Camden People’s Theatre and Arts Council

This event is for undergraduate finalists and postgraduate students in the School of English and Drama, and students on the MSc Creative Arts and Mental Health. 

Over the course of an afternoon in BLOC Cinema (Arts One), you’ll have the opportunity to attend sessions on:

  • Pitching your performance ideas to theatres (with The Camden People’s Theatre)
  • Getting into journalism (with The Guardian)
  • Making your first steps in publishing (with Faber & Faber)
  • Getting funding for your project (with the Arts Council)

This is your chance to ask questions, pitch ideas, and find out more about careers in these sectors in a relaxed and friendly setting. 

If this wasn’t enough, we’ll also be hosting a social with free food and drinks immediately following the event.

Sign up, and come along to celebrate finishing your assignments among friends! 

Timings/speaker schedule

  • 2 – 2.30: arrivals and introduction
  • 2.30 – 3.15: first set of two breakout sessions:
    • Arts Council
    • Faber & Faber
  • 3.15 – 3.30: break, changeover
  • 3.30 – 4.15: second set of breakout sessions:
    • Camden People’s Theatre
    • The Guardian
  • 4.15 – 4.45: outro
  • 4.45 – on: social (

https://qmul.targetconnect.net/leap/event.html?id=11817&service=Careers%20Service

English, Drama and Creative Writing Courses – September 2023 Entry

The courses we’re running for 2023/24 are below. Click the link

Undergraduate (all BA)

Postgraduate (all MA)

We also co-deliver:

MSc Creative Arts and Mental Health

English and Drama Newsletter – May 2023 Edition

May Events

 

THE VERBATIM FORMULA

BATTLES: SLAY YOUR DRAGONS

Fri 5 May 2023 – 17:00-19:30 – In-person at QMUL Mile End
 Care-experienced young people use arts to share experiences of facing the battles and slaying dragons in the care system today
 Join us to discover and celebrate a year-long project. TVF’s care-experienced co-researchers have created this event to share the important parts for them. 

Book here 

LEO BAECK INSTITUTE LONDON LECTURE SERIES 2023
THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY: MYTHS, IMAGES AND IMAGININGS ABOUT JEWS

THE VIRTUOUS JEWESS – PROFESSOR NADIA VALMAN

Tue 9 May 2023 – 14:30-18:30 = In-person at QMUL Mile End
A lecture series organised by the Leo Baeck Institute London in cooperation with the German Historical Institute London.
 This season’s lecture series ‘The Good, The Bad and The Ugly: Myths, Images and Imaginings about Jews’ seeks to explore the connection of visual narratives in the context of beauty, ugliness and morality with representations of Jews and Jewishness in the Western world from the Middle Ages to the present day. We aim to examine the subject from different historical, social and artistic perspectives ranging from medieval mythology to Orientalism, Zionism, Feminism or modern aesthetics, and through the lens of a selection of diverse media including painting, photography and comics. 

Book here 

THE QUEEN MARY CENTRE FOR RELIGION AND LITERATURE IN ENGLISH SYMPOSIUM – ‘FORMS OF (UN)BELIEF’ 

Tue 9 May 2023 – 14:30-18:30 = In-person at QMUL Mile End
In this symposium, scholars working on religious belief and unbelief in Britain from the early modern period to the twentieth century (including Nil Palyabik and Suzanne Hobson) will share work-in-progress. Themes explored will include practices of belief; the uses of language; questions of translation; activities in educational and commercial settings as well as professional religious environments; accommodations and clashes between doctrine, philosophy, and everyday life; and the role of Scripture. For full details please see the Eventbrite listing.

[picture credit: Saint Thomas the Apostle puts his finger in the lance wound of the risen Christ. Etching by G. de Lairesse. Wellcome CollectionPublic Domain Mark] 

Book here

 

QUORUM: DR SYLVAN BAKER

Wed 10 May 2023 – 17:30-19:00 

Let me tell you a story: Heuristic Practice, Research and Participation
 ‘In this conversation, I would like to narratively explore ways in which threads of my research and thinking may offer alternative ways to consider change in applied arts practices, and for whom. Emerging from the idea that change is founded on reflection, understanding and collaboration, I will explore seemingly disparate strands of work to evolve a practice research approach centred around partnership and collaboration – maybe even co-intention?

Thoughts from these musing include: For the practitioners/researchers what might also be at stake in terms of change, as well as the participants in work that intervenes in communities?

To what extent can practitioners genuinely be researchers? 

Book now 

ANNUAL CATHERINE SILVERSTONE LECTURE: CLARE HEMMINGS

Thu 11 May 2023 – 17:30-19:00 – In-person at QMUL Mile End
 Clare Hemmings (LSE) presents a lecture at Queen Mary University of London on “Accepting the Gifts: Reading Loss as Queer Feminist Method”. 

Book now

 

C19 LEGACIES & LIABILITIES: RELIGION, SCIENCE, AND TECHNOLOGY
Thu 11 May 2023, 17:30-19:00 – In-person at QMUL Mile End

This research conversation event is part of the series ‘Legacies and Liabilities? Decolonial, Interdisciplinary, and Intersectional Approaches to the Nineteenth Century Now’. It will focus on interconnections between religion, science, and technology, including fact/faith binaries and links with political identity.

We are excited to be joined by a panel of expert speakers:Rachel Bryant Davies (QMUL)Simon Goldhill (Cambridge)Brian Murray (KCL)Clare Stainthorp (QMUL)Jon Topham (Leeds)The roundtable discussion will be followed by an opportunity to continue conversations over refreshments. 

Book now 

A DAY WITH MICHÈLE BARRETT
19 May 2023, 09:30-19:00 – In-person at QMUL Mile End
 A day of talks reflecting on and celebrating the pioneering research of Professor Michèle Barrett.

Contributors Include: Nadia Atia, Rachel Bowlby, Markman Ellis, Roberta Hamilton, Ann Rosalind Jones, Clara Jones, Cora Kaplan, David Lammy, Donna Landry, Gerald Maclean, David McDonald, David Olusoga, Anne Phillips, Ellen Ross, Brenda Silver, Anna Snaith, Peter Stallybrass and Victoria Walker. 

Book now

 

STAGING DECADENCE: DRESS TO KILL

Wed 24 May 2023 – 17:00-19:00 – In-person at QMUL Mile End & OnlineFabulous filigree, garments of disease, rumours of a colossal fatberg clogging the city’s sewers…

For this special Quorum event, we celebrate the materiality of decadence on stage: its spectacular costuming, spatialisation, spillages, eccentricities, and the detailing of voluptuous rot.
 Featuring live performances from Hasard Le Sin, Sadie Sinner and Miss HerNia; screenings of work by jaamil olawale kosoko, Toco Nikaido and Angel Rose; an exhibition of decadent costume by Julia Bardsley; a performative presentation by Adam Alston – and rounded off with a roundtable discussion. Book here

Events Digest

Cultural Heritage and the Climate Emergency In Debate 

Live on People’s Palace Projects Youtube on Tuesdays 9, 16, 23 at 14:00 BST

Subscribe to the PPP channel

 Digital History and Collaborative Research – Online Panel DiscussionTue 23 May from 17:00 An online panel discussion co-hosted by Royal Historical Society and The Living with Machines Project. Speakers: Daniel Edelstein (Stanford University), Maryanne Kowaleski (Fordham), Jon Lawrence (Exeter), Katrina Navickas (Hertfordshire) and Ruth Ahnert (Queen Mary London, chair).

Book now

News

 New Writing Prize

‘I chose Santa Cruz as it’s close to the ocean and the campus is built into the forest.”Hi, I’m Isabella and I’m an English Literature & Creative Writing student, currently on a year abroad programme at UC Santa Cruz in California. We’re only 90 minutes away from San Francisco but we get all the joy of being surrounded by nature.’

See Isabella’s Instagram Takeover 

I don’t know what gender is, but I do, and I can, and we all do’: An interview with Clare Hemmings
An interview with Clare Hemmings,  Professor of Feminist Theory and Head of the Department of Gender Studies at the London School of Economics given by Susan Rudy (English).

A leading figure in UK feminist theory, her research insists that we acknowledge matters of ambivalence and uncertainty in our history-making, storytelling and theorising. 

Read the article 

Brian Dillon (Creative Writing) writes ‘What does the essay do?’ article for TLS
 This article in the Times Literary Supplement focuses on ‘The role, shape and purpose of the essay today’

Read the article 

News Digest

MOJISOLA ADEBAYO (Drama)‘s shows STARS and Family Tree, both written by SED Lecturer Mojisola Adebayo have been nominated for a total of FIVE Offies awards including best play, best lead performer and best video design for STARS and best set design and best lead performer for Family Tree. Both plays tour through May and June and both play texts are now published by Bloomsbury Methuen Drama as well. 

ABBIE JUKES (English PhD Grad) publishes her first book ‘An Introduction to Kamila Shamsie’s Home Fire’. 

Order here

 Apologies if we missed any listings or made any errors, do let us know and we can post on social media.

Also if you have any news for our next newsletter please do reply or get in touch.

Best wishes,

Ru

Rupert Dannreuther

Marketing Manager
sed-web@qmul.ac.uk

Queen Mary University of London
#FutureQMUL

My Journey With British Culture

Moving to the UK was the most challenging part of my life. My mother is English and my father is Iraqi but immigrated to the UK, so by definition, I am British. However, living in Lebanon from the age of seven to seventeen has instilled in me a hybrid culture that is definitely more Lebanese than it is British, despite my lack of Lebanese heritage.

When I moved to the UK it was to complete my final year of A Levels, and my brother and I were sponsored by a boarding school while my parents and other brother stayed in Lebanon. During that year, my mum gave me a very helpful comparison to process my culture shock. She said moving cultures kind of works the same as the five stages of grief, which is what I’ll be using to outline my journey.

Whether you have lived in the UK your whole life or are experiencing culture shock yourself, I hope this illuminates something to you, and makes you think about what culture means in your life.

Denial

The first thing I thought was, ‘this can’t be happening.’ I told myself that this unfriendly, unwelcoming, self-serving culture was something that could never get to me. I refused to interact with it, refused to acknowledge it. I also refused to take it seriously.

There were so many moments when I first got to the UK that felt surreal because I was in denial. One thing I noticed the most was the way people approached friendship here. It was almost as if I had to prove myself as worthy of people’s friendship because I was new, rather than being accepted into friendship groups immediately, and then judged as to whether I was worth sticking with.

My denial made me think that something was wrong with me. That people here worked the same as they did in Lebanon, they just hated me, which is why I wasn’t making friends easily, or on the deep level that I wanted.

Anger

Once the denial dissipated, the anger took over. I recognised that British culture was real, and that my culture shock was real, but instead of accepting it, I despised it.

My hate extended towards everything. Bland British food, cold British weather, unfriendly British people, highly regulated British systems. I was constantly comparing England to Lebanon, and it made me angry that they were different because I didn’t know how to function. I blamed my surroundings for the feeling of being out of my comfort zone.

I was also angry at the fact that I had no choice but to eventually accept British culture. I didn’t want to give in – it made me feel like a traitor. With hindsight, though, that was definitely the unhealthiest way of looking at it.

Bargaining

It was a constant back and forth of whether I swallowed my pride and tried to accept British culture or kept my head in the sand and stayed hateful.

The anger was a much longer phase than the bargaining. Most of the bargaining I did in my head connects to what I said about feeling like a traitor – it was a constant back and forth of whether I swallowed my pride and tried to accept British culture or kept my head in the sand and stayed hateful.

It’s so interesting revisiting these feelings now, over a year later, when I am in such a better place. I’ve come to love certain things about British culture, and I’ve adopted them myself. Going to uni and meeting people outside the small bubble of my school has opened my heart to so many new experiences and stories.

I love British people. Yes, I still have frustrations, but I’ve learned so much from my culture shock. And the biggest lesson has been understanding that being British doesn’t take anything away from my 10 years in Lebanon – having a new culture does not erase any of your original one.

Sadness

The fourth stage of grief is depression, but with culture shock, I think it’s more of a deep sadness, a feeling of loss for everything you’ve left behind and what you have to embrace.

Like anger, sadness was a long phase, lasting months. But it got better and better as time went on, unlike anger. Despite being sad, I found rays of light that took shape in special friends I made, new hobbies and interests, even planning my university choices. The sadness got lesser and lesser, and my pride started to crack.

I finally began focussing on the good things about the UK. Fish and chips. Systems that worked. High quality of living; never having to think of electricity shortages or clean water. Public transport. Green grass. Responding to every emotion with a cup of tea. It was looking up, and I am happily in the final stage of culture shock now.

Acceptance

To anyone who is struggling with British culture: it gets better. I promise you. You will learn to love it eventually, and what I have found fascinating is that although it can be hard initially making British friends, once they are friends with you, they are friends for life.

I saw a quote on Pinterest by Clifton Fadiman that said, “When you travel, remember that a foreign country is not designed to make you comfortable. It is designed to make its own people comfortable.”

“When you travel, remember that a foreign country is not designed to make you comfortable. It is designed to make its own people comfortable.”

This has resonated with me. And I am proud to say I have two cultures now. Having one does not take away any of the validity or worth of the other.

SED Opportunity Digest – 22 April 2023 – Concise Version

If you get to the end and apply for an opportunity please let us know and we’ll give you a freebie.

Please let us know if you have any suggestions for the next edition via sed-web@qmul.ac.uk

Don’t forget your careers service is open all semester and can help with finding jobs, applications and interviews. Book an appointment or email your careers consultant Fliss Bush

3 unmissable updates

  1. See Mojisola Adebayo’s ★★★★★ shows STARS at ICA – closes 4 May and Family Tree at Brixton House – closes Sunday 23 April
  2. Don’t miss Nil Palayik’s free book launch for Silent Teachers: Turkish Books and Oriental Learning in Early Modern Europe, 1544–1669’ Sign up for the Book launch and roundtable discussion on Wednesday 26 April 2023, 5:00PM – 7:30PM online or in person at The Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AB.
  3. MA studentship at Newcastle that might be of interest to UG finalists; it is for Black students looking to do an MA in English –  https://www.ncl.ac.uk/elll/study/postgraduate-funding/ (deadline 9 June).

From QMUL, Partners & Friends

Education: Reimagination, Decolonisation, and Change

Tue, 25 Apr 2023 19:00 – 20:30 BST

This event expands on ‘Reimagining Education’, a special issue of Wasafiri guest edited by Darren Chetty, Angelique Golding, and Nicola Rollock that explores this sociocultural moment. From government interventionism to widespread industrial action, how are the forces of change and continuity playing out in education in Britain today?

Chaired by Wasafiri’s Editor and Publishing Director Emily Mercer, we’ll hear from guest editor Angelique Golding and contributors including Sita Balani and Marvin Thompson: artists and educators who work at the site of this tension, whose work goes against the grain, challenges the status quo, and sits within a wider critical praxis of reimagination, decolonisation, and change.

Book a free ticket

Sex Panics, Capitalism, and the Global Right: An Evening Symposium with Max Fox, Rahul Rao, and Amy De’Ath

25 April 2023 | 6.00-8.00pm BST | Hybrid event (London or Zoom)

To register: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/sex-panics-capitalism-and-the-global-right-an-evening-symposium-tickets-601430644247

BIRKBECK SCHOOL OF ARTS – ARTS WEEK – 24-28 APRIL 2023

A week of events showcasing the latest creativity and research from Birkbeck’s School of Arts.

Book now

Accessible social media: What can you be doing? – Tue 25 Apr 2023 – HdK

Book ticket

NOW Festival at the Yard Theatre in Hackney Wick is open now

See the full programme

So Hot! Feeling the Heat in Contemporary Women’s Writing Seminar Series

26 April 2023

https://ilcs.sas.ac.uk/events/so-hot-feeling-heat-contemporary-womens-writing

Two exciting volunteering opportunities at GoodWork

As we prepare to launch Cohort Two of our Early Careers Programme this September, we are looking for volunteers to help with candidate assessments, once young people applications close on 2nd June!

These opportunities will be virtual and require a time commitment of 4 hours minimum. By volunteering, you will be supporting us to make our programme happen and also gain valuable insight into inclusive hiring processes.

Apply here or read more below

Industry Insights: Representation in TheatreSunday, 23 April 2023

Join leading theatre industry practitioners to discuss representation and diversity in the arts, and how current developments have impacted theatre, challenging assumptions, and celebrating new visions. Will include a Q&A.

Outside QMUL

London Arts and Health – Creativity and Wellbeing Week curated headline events!

A taster of just some of our headline events for Creativity and Wellbeing Week 2023 include:

  • Monday 15th May: What is the role of Creativity in a Health crisis? (Free, in person at King’s College London) with very special guests Michael Rosen, Kevin Fenton and more! BOOK NOW
  • Tuesday 16th May: NCCH APPG roundtable exploring Leadership and Strategy (Free, online) BOOK NOW
  • Tuesday 16th May: Creativity in a health crisis: What does the research tell us? (Free, online) BOOK NOW
  • Tuesday 16th May: Arts & Health Hub present: The Value of Lived Experience (Free, online) BOOK NOW
  • Wednesday 17th May: Creative Health Sandpit, big London meet-up (Free, at City Hall) BOOK NOW
  • Thursday 18th May: How to establish a Creative Health City Region, perspectives from Manchester (Free, online) BOOK NOW
  • Friday 19th May: Creativity and Dementia (Free, online) BOOK NOW
  • Friday 19th May: Launch of the ‘Queering Creative Health’ report (Free, in-person at QUEERCIRCLE) BOOK NOW

Short film submissions now open for the 2024 BFI Future Film Festival! Regular deadline: Friday 4 August

Want to be a part of the UK’s largest festival for young, emerging filmmakers? Want to see your film on the big screen at BFI Southbank? Want to kickstart your career with cash prizes and industry mentoring up for grabs? Submit your short film now to next year’s BFI Future Film Festival! Your film can be any genre, it just needs to have been made in the last two years, be 10 minutes or under in length, and you must have been aged 16-25 when you made the film. If you have any questions, email us at filmacademy@bfi.org.uk

We’ve officially launched the OPEN CALL for submissions for the long-awaited 2nd WOWZINE print magazine.

We’re looking for bold, authentic and first-person-led stories that explore the theme of pleasure through art, food, design, architecture, gender and sexuality from women, non-binary and other marginalised genders. 

Submit your work via the Submission Form.

The deadline for all submissions is 23.59 on Sunday 14th May 2023.

Weston Jerwood Creative Bursaries Toolkit Workshop Wed 26 Apr 2023

Jerwood Arts and people make it work – Workshop – Online

Book onto a half-day workshop to help put ideas around inclusivity into action, and drive positive change in the cultural sector.

Roundhouse Resident Artist Programme Deadline: Monday 24 April

Calling all 18-25 year-old performing artists! Apply to the Roundhouse Resident Artist Programme to develop your artistry, gain industry connections, perform on incredible stages, and level up your career in the creative industries.

The Space Crone Prize

Deadline for Submissions 30 April

“We are excited to announce The Space Crone Prize for speculative and science short fiction. The special one-off prize, established by Silver Press in collaboration with The Ursula K. Le Guin Literary Trust, celebrates the publication of Space Crone by Ursula K. Le Guin, a selection of essays edited by So Mayer and Sarah Shin. “

Free: Sinéad Rushe: Introduction to the Michael Chekhov Acting Technique

Join Olivier-nominated theatre director, Sinéad Rushe, for a hands-on workshop on the Michael Chekhov acting technique.

Free workshop: Pen to Print: An Introduction to Write On! – What Makes a Magazine?

 An insight to the process of putting a magazine together and publishing it

Sign up

INTERN TO CEO: LISA TREGALE | 25TH APRIL 2023 | 7PM

Join YPIA for the highly anticipated return of ‘Intern to CEO’, where we’ll hear from those at the top as they share their journey through the arts.

New Issue of the Publishing Post #69

Read it here for inspiration for those aspiring to go into publishing.

The CCL Postcolonial Theatre series, May 2023: South Asia and the Diaspora

11 May 2023. The Performance of Adaptation as a Postcolonial Strategy

Read more and book

18 May 2023. Bazaar Art, Bazaari Women: Nautch, Bibis and Courtesans in Nineteenth Century Kalighat Paintings (Bengal)

Read more and book

25 May 2023. Performance and the Quest for Identity among Communities of Bangladeshi Heritage in the UK

Read more and book

Skilled Summers are still looking for talented and enthusiastic UK students who are looking to have a life changing experience this summer to get paid to teach their skills, sport or hobby to children at top American summer camps.

This is the last week that the students can apply and we just wanted to put the word out to your university again to see if you have any students who would be interested in taking part for this summer 2023?

Included with the placement:

  • Minimum salary of $2,000
  • Accommodation, food and medical insurance
  • Minimum placement of 9 weeks at camp
  • Travel for 30 days around America after camp
  • Visa paperwork and assistance

Living and working at an American summer camp is a unique experience and can help the students develop their personal skills by putting themselves out of their comfort zones, immersing themselves into a different culture and it is also a great way to boost their CVs and make friends with their fellow campers from all over the world.

We are looking for students with skills in many areas such as land based sports, water sports, outdoor adventure, arts and crafts, mixed media, performing arts, singing, dancing etc. You can pretty much teach anything at summer camp!

Please if you have any students who you think would be interested can you ask them to fill in this interest form via our website – www.skilledsummers.co.uk/apply. Once they have filled in the form they will receive a ‘Welcome’ email with everything they need to know about this opportunity.

If you have any questions please feel free to reach out to me via email at info@skilledsummers.co.uk

SPRINT: Tue 7 – Mon 27 Mar 2023

Tickets £12 (or catch 2 shows in one night for only £16) NW1 residents go for £10 Students go for £8

See the full line up

Jobs and Opps Closing Soon

Government Communication Service Apprenticeships 24 April

The Old Vic seeks Front of House Assistants 24 Apr

Sick Artists Club: Open Call, Submissions from Sick and Disabled artists 30 Apr

The Spectator NO CV internship 2023: apply now – Deadline 1 May

NATO Internship Scheme 7 May 

Guardian Scott Trust Bursaries 15 May

Royal Television Society Bursaries 29 June

See all Queen Mary jobs

Updated: Further sources of interesting events, opportunities and jobs are…

Apples & Snakes Artists Newsletter | Arts Admin E-Digest | ArtsJobs | BBC Academy | Creative Access (Jobs) | Creative Lives in Progress | Creative Mentor Network | ERIC – Career + Opportunities App | Film London | IlikeNetworking | JournoResources | Lectures.London | MediaBeans (media jobs) | QMUL Careers | Presspad | Run the Check | ScreenSkills | Society of Young Publishers | Startup Jobs | Tower Hamlets Arts | Write at Home (freelance writing opps)



4 Things I Wish I Knew Before Starting My English Degree

English literature is often looked down on as a degree, but it’s actually incredibly versatile, transferrable and interesting. It teaches you original thought, critical thinking, deep analysis and so many other skills you can use in later life.

Like every degree, however, it has its challenges, and there are several things I wish I’d been told before starting my degree that would’ve made the process a lot smoother.

The biggest takeaway and piece of advice I’ll give, though, is enjoy it. Even when it feels like your teachers and peers are talking gibberish in your seminars, sit there and enjoy the fact that you are in an incredibly privileged position and in a degree that puts you rather than academics first.

1. Your lectures will not teach you your texts

An empty lecture hall viewed from the front full of black chairs and a lecture podium

When people tell you uni isn’t the same as school, they aren’t kidding. Lectures are not at all like lessons. Yes, you’re being talked at by a teacher for an hour, but lectures don’t have the same goals as school lessons do in the slightest. You come into lectures having already done extensive reading for the class, so you technically already ‘know’ the material. At school, you’re taught the material. Unfortunately, I didn’t realise this until I got to my first few lectures.

Advice: do at least SOME of the reading. I certainly haven’t done all of my required work for my lectures, but I’ve understood them the best when I’ve at least onced-over the texts that have been assigned. Lectures are all about encouraging further thinking that often deviates from the texts’ orginal intents and purposes. You bring in secondary thinkers to analyse literary works or apply today’s age to the text, not go through it line by line. Going into your lectures with this mindset can make a serious difference.

2. EVERYTHING is your responsibility

It was a shocker when I realised I had to buy all of the set texts myself. It was even more of a shocker when I realised my lecturers and seminar leaders were completely relying on me to show face in their classes and put in the work myself.

The dangerous part of uni is the ability we have to slack off and not actually do anything required of us. I wish someone had told me beforehand the extent of responsibility that was on me going into my degree. If you miss a class, you’re not going to be chased by your lecturers and seminar leaders. If you don’t do the reading, you’re not going to be punished. If you don’t have the material – tough.

The dangerous part of uni is the ability we have to slack off and not actually do anything required of us.

All this makes it so easy to let yourself go, and I certainly have, so if you are about to start your degree, consider the level of responsibility you have to uphold beforehand and seriously think about whether you can hack it or not, because you have to step up for yourself. No one else is going to.

3. Plan your assignments early

A table covered multi-coloured with sticky notes, some filled out, some empty

I have written some of my assignments the night before they’re due, and trust me, it’s not a fun experience. What is ironic about this point is that I WAS told by many people to start my assignments early, I just ignored them. But from experience, I assure you – it’s worth looking at them before their due date. Or at least deciding what you want to write about before you start writing.

Planning takes the stress and pressure off, and genuinely makes you feel so much better as a student. You feel productive which puts you in a better mood to write. Planning is just a good decision in general and I wish I did it more!

4. Original thinking > ‘correct’ thinking

A wooden silhouette of a person standing on a stair thinking, with spheres hovering above their head like thought bubbles

I was properly shook when my seminar leader told me that they are more likely to give a first to an essay that tried to have original thought and didn’t do it very well over an essay that was very well executed but was not original. English degrees are seriously all about forming your own opinions and arguments, and about reacting to the texts put in front of you, rather than just absorbing them.

If I’d been told this earlier on, my essays will have looked so much better and I would have enjoyed my classes way more, because especially in first year, it’s about training your brain to think originally, not about getting it right.

If you’re going into your first year of an English degree or even just feel like you wanted a refresher, I hope these four things were helpful, but like I said, my biggest piece of advice is to enjoy the moments while they last. Uni is a special time and you can learn so much from it, both inside the classroom and out.

How Campus Life Has Taught Me More Than My Lectures

My attitude before going into uni was probably just like everyone else’s: “I’m going to university for my degree, with a side of life.” What I quickly realised as soon as I moved into halls of residence was that reality is the complete opposite of this.

All of a sudden, I had to learn how to cook, how to budget, how to do laundry, how to de-clog a sink, how to book a doctor’s appointment, how to fix a toilet flush, and countless other things that had never even been on my radar before moving out (far too many plumbing-related for my liking).

This new lifestyle quickly overtook my plans for an academic comeback. I definitely struggled with balancing my responsibilities and my academics, but I also realised that having a life on campus and learning to be an adult was a lot more important than getting full marks on my assignments. The biggest positive takeaway for me has been letting go of academic achievement as my source of validation. Hopefully I can encourage you through my experience to do the same!

1. Living in halls

A girl with black hair is chopping carrots on a wooden chopping board in a kitchen with a soup cooking on the stove.

Moving into my flat at Queen Mary, I immediately knew I was lucky. I bonded with my flatmates instantly and have made some of my best friends through living in halls. A lot of people don’t have the same experience, which is definitely a difficult position to be in. But I think most people can agree that living in halls teaches you core life lessons almost instantly.

Living in halls teaches you core life lessons almost instantly.

I’ve really understood the importance of personal space balanced with hanging out with friends through living communally. I’ve been pushed out of my comfort zone in a way that’s helped me get to know my preferences as an extravert, but also empathise with people who are introverted and need more social boundaries.

My confidence has skyrocketed since moving into halls. I’m so much more expressive with my wants and needs because of an increased need for communication with my flatmates. And having a space to invite people over to has helped with my confidence for making friends. My anxiety has really gone down because of living in halls and I know many others who would agree with me!

2. Becoming my own person

A view of Big Ben and the houses of Parliament at dusk from the River Thames

Campus life has really forced me to rely on myself. As a result, who I am as a person has had to grow accordingly, especially my self-sufficiency. I don’t have my parents around to wake me up for classes – I have to get myself places on time. I don’t have someone to make decisions for me – I have to accept that my actions, whether wise or stupid, have consequences, and they’re mine to deal with.

Separating from the safety of living at home to live on campus has consequently helped guide me toward who I want to become in the future. True independence comes with becoming your own person, seperate from the expectations of other people, and I have found that campus life has fostered a new identity for me in the most positive way.

Becoming an adult is most often achieved through trial and error, and university campus life is the best environment for that.

I’ve had so many new experiences that I wouldn’t be exposed to if I was living at home. And I’ve made mistakes that have also shaped who I am so I can become the best version of me. Becoming an adult is most often achieved through trial and error, and university campus life is the best environment for that.

3. Learning true responsibility

A pair of red Converse shoes are standing in front of a compass drawn onto the concrete floor

More often than I would like to admit, I’ve snoozed my alarm and skipped the lecture I promised myself I’d go to the night before. But I’ve learned what responsibility looks like on a truly human level. The are so many opportunities at uni to lack integrity, like ‘forgetting’ to pay someone back after they’ve bought you something, leaving a mess on the kitchen counter for someone else to clean up, even leaving the toilet seat up.

What makes a difference is learning to put your pride aside and take responsibility for the little things of living communally to set yourself up for integrity in the future. Campus life is such a great test for life beyond your academic years. And you get to make friends on a deeper level than ever before. The sheer amount of time you can spend with people when you live on campus is incredible.

I will confidently say that I have learned so much more from just living on campus than I have from all my uni lectures combined. For anyone who is um-ing and ah-ing over whether to live on campus or not, I will always recommend it as the best option if that is within your financial and familial capabilities. You will be so grateful for the experiences you’ve had on campus in the future!

English and Drama Newsletter – April 2023 Edition

Welcome to your April newsletter from the School of English and Drama at Queen Mary University of London. 6 Things to Do in April
  1. Offer Holder Day: If you’re an offer holder come to our last date of this year on 19 April 2023. Book here
  2. Summer Open Days: visit our Mile End campus on 16 & 17 June 2023. Book here
  3. Private subject-specific campus tour or 1-2-1: Talk to a human about your course interests. Register here
  4. Apply for our HSS Master’s Black and Global Majority Studentships Read more
  5. Read about how important humanities are: in the Higher Education Policy Institute report which our academic Tiffany Watt-Smith is quoted.
  6. Read our research newsletter: Find out about our world-changing research in this update. Read it here
Lebanon to London: The Creative Journey Amaal Fawzi (pictued above) from BA English with Creative Writing shares her journey in this incredible blog series. Photo from article: Skiing and Swimming: The Lebanese Winter for Tourists Discover the full series April Events Subtexts: TransfixionsWed, 12 Apr 2023 18:00 – 20:00 The Octagon At Queen Mary University Of London 327 Mile End Road London E1 4NS Subtexts: Transfixions is an evening of poetry and literary performances by four mesmerising, artfully and politically charged writers, Hasti, So Mayer, Nat Raha, and Shola von Reinhold. Organised by the School of English and Drama at Queen Mary University of London. Free and open to all. Book your free ticket Stars by Mojisola Adebayo13 April-4 May – ICA A new afrofuturist music play about pleasure, desire and female orgasms. STARS is a hilarious and moving mix of celebratory Black queer empowerment and arousal. Performed by one woman and a live DJ, with projected animations, we join in an old woman’s search for her lost orgasm, spanning across outer space, with dustings of African mythology and folklore in an unabashedly queer, feminist rallying call.Read the QMUL news story Book ticketsFamily Tree by Mojisola Adebayo 12-23 April – Brixton House Family Tree is a beautifully poetic drama about race, health, the environment, and the incredible legacy of one of the most influential Black women of modern times. Fearlessly honest, hilarious, and ultimately transformative, this award-winning play is both a remembrance and a celebration. Henrietta Lacks is one of most remarkable people in medical history. Her cells form the basis of the most important medical research and breakthroughs happening today, from cancer to HIV to COVID. But Henrietta never knew any of this. Her cells were taken without her or her family’s knowledge or permission. Henrietta was a Black woman: she is not the only one whose body has been exploited by the medical establishment. Read the QMUL news story Book tickets ‘The Shapes of the State in Early Modern Ireland’ Dr Neil Johnston18 April – Hybrid – 19:00 Speaker: Dr Neil Johnston, Head of Early Modern Records, The National Archives, UK. Abstract: Royal government in Ireland expanded and evolved over the centuries, creating extensive paperwork in the course of its ordinary business. A significant amount of this survived until 1922, forming the core of the collection within the Public Record Office of Ireland. This paper will examine how the offices of state developed, charting their remit, function, and output. Focussing on the seventeenth century, it will consider the ways in which people in Ireland interacted with the state, what records emerged from these interactions, and what records survived down to the twentieth century. The destruction of the collection in 1922 created archival ghosts, where finding aids and publications give partial insights into what was available to researchers. By concentrating on the records of the central executive and the equity courts, this paper will endeavour to provide some insights into new or emerging research pathways for scholars of the period. The event is free and all are welcome. For further info please email IHS Secretary Dr Caoimhe Whelan caoimhe.whelan@qmul.ac.uk 2023 IHS Programme of events: https://www.irishhistoricalstudies.ie/irish-historical-society/ Sign up Book launch: Silent Teachers: Turkish Books and Oriental Learning in Early Modern Europe, 1544–1669 26 April 2023, 17:00-19:30 at The Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, London, WC1H 0AB Book launch and roundtable discussion with the author Nil Palabıyık (QMUL) and guest speakers Philip Alexander (Manchester), Theodor Dunkelgrün (Cambridge) and Simon Mills (Newcastle). Silent Teachers considers for the first time the influence of Ottoman scholarly practices and reference tools on oriental learning in early modern Europe. Telling the story of oriental studies through the annotations, study notes, and correspondence of European scholars, it demonstrates the central but often overlooked role that Turkish-language manuscripts played in the achievements of early orientalists. Dispersing the myths and misunderstandings found in previous scholarship, this book offers a fresh history of Turkish studies in Europe and new insights into how Renaissance intellectuals studied Arabic and Persian through contemporaneous Turkish sources. www.routledge.com/9780367359782
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INVITATION – PRE-PREMIERE  “Vale? Is it worth it?  Five artists in the front line against Brazil’s worst environmental crime” 26 April 2023, 16:00 at BLOC Media Studio – Queen Mary University of LondonJoin People’s Palace Projects and Queen Mary University of London for the launch of the documentary Vale? The free screening will be introduced by Paul Heritage (Drama) and Leandro Valiati and followed by a Q&A. Synopsis: Through music, poetry and circus performances, five Brazilian artists talk about their grief, fears and hope four years after the Brumadinho Dam collapsed, killing 300 people. The documentary, directed by Paul Heritage and Marcelo Barbosa (Indianara, 2019)  focuses on the impact of the collapse on the artistic and cultural heritage of this rich mining region in Brazil and asks – Is it worth it?
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Book Ahead
An Ambulance to the Future (The Second Chance)Thursday 18 May 2023 – Whitechapel Gallery – £5 Join us for the first event in Martin O’Brien’s An Eternity of Nothingness trilogy made as part of his time as Whitechapel Gallery Writer in Residence. Mixing video, live performance action and parables, this performance imagines a world in which immortality is possible. Drawing on stories of immortal people, it paints the picture of life lived over and over again, a life that doesn’t need water or oxygen, a life without the promise of an end point. It is a meditation on endings and new beginnings. With his usual intensity and wit, this work continues O’Brien’s explorations of the politics of death by asking what the idea of immortality can help us understood about being mortal.
Book here
The Queen Mary Centre for Religion and Literature in English invites you to a symposium on ‘Forms of (un)belief’  Tuesday 9 May 2023, 2.30-6.30pm – Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, E1 4NS, ArtsTwo room 2.17 In this symposium, scholars working on religious belief and unbelief in Britain from the early modern period to the twentieth century (including Nil Palyabik and Suzanne Hobson) will share work-in-progress. Themes explored will include practices of belief; the uses of language; questions of translation; activities in educational and commercial settings as well as professional religious environments; accommodations and clashes between doctrine, philosophy, and everyday life; and the role of Scripture. For full details please see the Eventbrite listing. [picture credit: Saint Thomas the Apostle puts his finger in the lance wound of the risen Christ. Etching by G. de Lairesse. Wellcome CollectionPublic Domain Mark] 
Book here
‘A Day with Michèle Barrett’Friday 19 May at Queen Mary, University of London You are warmly invited to ‘A Day with Michèle Barrett’ on Friday 19 May at Queen Mary, University of London. This event brings together a range of scholars to reflect on Professor Barrett’s pioneering interdisciplinary research and celebrate her major contributions to literary studies, feminist theory and the history of the First World War. The event will include a preview of WoolfNotes, a ground-breaking project led by Prof. Barrett to digitise Virginia Woolf’s extensive reading and research notes. Contributors Include: Nadia Atia, Rachel Bowlby, Roberta Hamilton, Ann Rosalind Jones, Clara Jones, Cora Kaplan, David Lammy, Donna Landry, Gerald Maclean, David McDonald, David Olusoga, Anne Phillips, Ellen Ross, Brenda Silver, Anna Snaith, Peter Stallybrass and Victoria Walker. Download the programme Listen to Professor Michèle Barrett on A Room of One’s Own (BBC Radio 4)
Book here
Events Digest Festival of Education – 18-20 April – Online The Festival will explore the theme of Inclusive Education, addressing the visible and hidden barriers to success and exploring pedagogical approaches that open the doors of opportunity for all. Book here
News
How studying English Literature boosted my career prospects by our English graduate Sofiya Shazal’Fact: studying English Literature is one of the most useful things you can do for yourself — personally and professionally’Read Sofiya’s story
The long line of Black and Asian British literatureSusheila Nasta, Emeritus Professor of Modern and Contemporary Literature at Queen Mary University of London, explores Black and Asian British writing.Watch the video at Expeditions
Jerry Brotton has made 10 part BBC Radio series on the ‘other’ Tudors ‘We Other Tudors’, recounting the lives of ten men and women who settled in Tudor London, including Muslims, Jews, Africans and Native Americans. The series will be broadcast every night at 2245h starting on 24 April on Radio 3. See the programme page
News Digest SITA BALANI: SEXUAL MODERNITY AND THE MAKING OF RACE (pictured above) book launching 16 May. Preorder now ALFRED HIATT CONTESTING AUTHENTICITY: On 30 March 2023, Alfred Hiatt(English) gave a paper on Charles Bertram’s Forged Roman Map of Britain at ‘Contesting Authenticity in Literature, 1200-1700’. MATT RUBERY TALKS READING ON TIKTOK FOR WORLD BOOK DAY: Watch Matt’s TikTok Read more in this news story about Matt’s work Listen to Matt talking on BBC Radio 4 talking about The pioneering New York publisher Marianne Mantell who paved the way for audio books… CALL FOR PAPERS: Conference on UK Spoken-Word Poetries Since 1965 Find out more
Apologies if we missed any listings or made any errors, do let us know and we can post on social media. Also if you have any news for our next newsletter please do reply or get in touch. Best wishes, Ru Rupert Dannreuther Marketing Manager sed-web@qmul.ac.uk Queen Mary University of London #FutureQMUL

How the Royal Commonwealth Society Used Literature to Change My Life

A bouquet of white and purple flowers with unopened lilies at the back of the arrangement and big green leaves.

Whether you are enrolled in an English degree like me, or dropped the subject as soon as you reached A-Level, everyone can agree that literature is an unbelievable force for change. My (almost unintentional!) involvement in the Royal Commonwealth Society is the perfect demonstration of this. One little poem I wrote near the end of Year Thirteen amidst my A-Level revision has since taken me places I never could have imagined.

The flowers in the image above were a thank-you from the Royal Commonwealth Society (RCS) for a speech they asked me to give at the Commonwealth Day fundraiser banquet on the 14th of March this year. If I had said this sentence to myself in March 2022, I would have laughed in disbelief. ‘Who am I to be attending such high-profile events?’ But it isn’t me. It’s literature, and my role as a representative of the positive force it can have on the world.

The RCS’ focus on literature is representing young people (specifically from disadvantaged backgrounds), representing the under-represented, promoting education, and spreading peace across the nations. The Commonwealth was never something on my radar before I became involved with it, but seeing what they are doing with literature, especially for young people, has inspired me and given me life-changing opportunities.

The Queen’s Commonwealth Essay Competition

Find me on the third slide smiling with my certificate!

The Queen’s Commonwealth Essay Competition (QCEC) is the oldest international writing competition for schools. The RCS has been delivering it since 1883! Winners have gone on to receive Pulitzer prizes and become authors, and I came to hear about it through my English teacher last year, in my final and only year of secondary schooling in the UK.

When Mrs Whyte first emailed me about the competition, I ignored it. The criteria was to write a poem, short story or essay based on the set prompts, and in my mind, my A Level revision was far more important than a creative writing competition. However Mrs Whyte was determined I had a chance and emailed me again, encouraging me to enter. I ended up writing a poem called ‘Nursing Homes,’ which can be found next to my picture on the page at this link: https://www.royalcwsociety.org/meet-the-winners

A few months later, I received the news that I came runner-up in the senior category of the competition, and I was absolutely flabbergasted. What unfolded next felt almost like a dream. I was put up in a hotel in County Hall for a week with my parents, and the other winners of the competition were flown out from all around the Commonwealth, including places like New Zealand, India, and Uganda. Every day we visited several significant cultural sites in London, like the Tower of London, the BBC Broadcasting House and the British Library. We also met incredible people like the Speaker of the House of Commons and the High Commissioners of Singapore and Australia.

The highlight of the week was the final day when we were invited to Buckingham Palace for the awards ceremony. The people in attendance came from all different areas of the RCS. I got to chat with Dame Susan Hill about ‘The Woman in Black’ and Geri Halliwell read my poem out to the party (and gave me a hug!). Then, most importantly, I had the honour of meeting HM the Queen Consort and receiving my certificate from her. The pictures of me and Camilla featured on the Times and the Royal Family official Instagram, and it was incredible to receive screenshots of the articles from my friends who didn’t know I had won the competition!

“Each year, young people write on a theme that stems from the Commonwealth’s values and principles, developing key literacy skills whilst also fostering an empathetic and open-minded world view.”

About the QCEC, royalcwsociety.org

High Commissioners and Westminster Abbey!

The main entrance of Westiminster Abbey at dusk decorated with snow covered Christmas trees

What made everything even more special that day at Buckingham Palace was the fact that it was my 18th birthday. I had my first legal drink in the presence of royalty! But, also, when I turned 18, I was generously invited to become an associate fellow of the RCS because I had won the competition. I was able to choose which part of the society I wanted to involve myself in, and of course, I chose literature.

My passion for literature really started to blossom. Knowing that I was representing something so important made me think back to how lucky I was to have entered the competition. I’d grown up in Lebanon and was forced to go to a boarding school for my final year of A Levels because Lebanon’s socio-economic situation had deteriorated to the extent that I wasn’t able to do my exams there. I had never been encouraged to do creative writing at school. Reading had always been for losers throughout my childhood. The fact I’d come to this point and been recognised with such exposure and success was almost a miracle. I can’t wait to start giving back to the RCS since they’ve given me such incredible opportunities.

I can’t wait to start giving back to the RCS since they’ve given me such incredible opportunities.

A little while after the ‘Winner’s Week,’ I was invited to the High Commissioner’s Banquet at Guildhall. I got to have dinner with more people I never would have dreamed of meeting. There were most definitely over 150 guests, and though I felt out of my depth, being the youngest in the room, it built my confidence and was an honour to represent the RCS. I also got an invite to the Princess of Wales’ Carol Service at Westminster Abbey which is broadcasted on TV every Christmas Eve, and it was surreal and beautiful to see that in person.

Commonwealth Day & Banquet

A dinner table with a knife, fork and name card saying 'Ms Amaal Fawzi'

I thought things couldn’t possibly go up from here, but yet again, the influence and importance of literature took me as a representative once more – this time as the ‘Mace Bearer’ for the Commonwealth Day Service on Monday the 13th of March. I had received an invite to the service already, and was unbelievably excited to attend – I might even feature as a face in the crowd on TV!

However, my socks were blown right off when a few days before the service, I received a call asking if I would be willing to take the role of Mace Bearer in the royal procession down the abbey. Essentially, I would have to walk in front of their majesties the King, Queen, and the rest of the royal family as they walked slowly down the abbey, place the mace in front of the King, bow, and lead the procession again on the way out.

I was so shocked that I wondered if they’d gotten the right person for a second. This seemed so out of my depth that I wasn’t sure if I could do it. But then I thought of all the other young people like me I could inspire if I did this – I wanted to let them know that just one little poem can be the thing to shake up their world! The link to the service is featured below – you can see me at the beginning and end wearing a blue suit and white gloves, holding the Commonwealth Mace, which is a massive solid gold stick with the flags of all the countries of the Commonwealth etched onto it. I was even name dropped by the BBC presenter at the end of the service, and it still blows my mind that I was on live TV!

Seeing my name card on the tablecloth in that dining room in the London Marriott Hotel almost brought tears to my eyes.

Not only did I get to be a part of this incredible event, but I got to connect with people all across the Commonwealth doing life-changing things for people in their countries and communities. Meeting the Royal Family was probably the highlight of my life – I’ll never forget exchanging smiles with them!

And finally, I was asked to say a speech at the Commonwealth Day Banquet the next day – again, the youngest person in the room with only a poem going for her. Seeing my name card on the tablecloth in that dining room in the London Marriott Hotel almost brought tears to my eyes. It’s amazing that my story can be a testimony to the power of literature. If you feel like your writing is insignificant, please be encouraged that it is so significant, more than you know!

You’ll find me walking in front of the King and Queen in a blue suit, holding the big golden stick!

SED Opportunity Digest – 5 April 2023 – New Concise Version

Welcome to our latest round up of events, opportunities and schemes that may help you meet collaborators, improve your career prospects or simply broaden your horizons.

DON’T MISS ANY OPPORTUNITIES – GET THEM WHILE THEY’RE HOT!

Subscribe to our Llama Jobs Whatsapp Group

If you get to the end and apply for an opportunity please let us know and we’ll give you a freebie.

Please let us know if you have any suggestions for the next edition via sed-web@qmul.ac.uk

Don’t forget your careers service is open all semester and can help with finding jobs, applications and interviews. Book an appointment or email your careers consultant Fliss Bush

3 unmissable updates

  1. Last few tickets available for SUBTEXTS: Transfixions evening of politically charged writing next week. Everyone is welcome – snap them up!
  2. Book ahead for Mad Hearts – The Arts And Mental Health: Queering Boundaries conference in June
  3. Last chance to apply for Expeditions Fund – closes 28 April

From QMUL, Partners & Friends

Today – Wednesday 5 April don’t miss your chance to meet up with Lois Weaver and the gang…

Care (for your future) Cafe

  • Pinter Studio in Arts One 
  •  5-7 pm every Wednesday  – 8 March and running through to 31 May 
  • (with the exception of 18 and 26 April) 
  • We will be live and in person from 5- 7 in the Pinter but you can Zoom in from 6-7 if you can’t make it to Mile End.  
  • Email L.weaver@qmul.ac.uk for the Zoom link. 

Care (for your future) Cafes are an opportunity for students, graduates, and artist friends to drop in and talk about life and livelihood. It is also an opportunity to get to know Air Supply, which is an informal collection of students and graduates who meet regularly to share support, resources, and their experiences of being independent artists and producers.  

Air Supply will be producing the Peopling the Palace Festival, Queen Mary University of London 5-11 June. 

Café Cafes are a place for people to gather – their wits, thoughts, and comrades in action. They are a temporary venue for communitas, conversation, and activity within a spoken and visible frame of ‘care’. 

Society Events before end of semester

CALL OUT FOR SUBMISSIONS: A Season of Bangla Drama  – 20 Acts of Love

2-26 November 2023

A Season of Bangla Drama will back in 2023 for its 20th anniversary, and we are seeking new writing.

Submissions are now open.

Deadline is on Tuesday 25 April at 10am.

The theme for 2023 is love. These can be applied in a wide variety of ways such as romantic love, love for the environment/climate change, caring or helping someone who cannot do anything back for you, love for  siblings, parent and friends or self-love.  We are looking for play that  show kindness, generosity, gratitude  and celebrating the best qualities of the human race!  The possibilities are endless…

If you would like to get involved in 2023, please download the Expression of Interest form on link below. Please read the guidelines and criteria carefully before filling out and returning the form.  https://bit.ly/41gveXv

It is essential that you send a 3 minute video of a scene from the play you wish to submit via a YouTube or Vimeo link, This can be a reading recorded on your phone, a recording of a Zoom meeting or rehearsal (though you must be send footage as a YouTube or Vimeo link).  Use this opportunity to speak to the panel about your play.  As there is a limitation on words on the form, this is your 3 minute pitch.

no cost in giving programme 

Cost of Living Crisis Eased for Young Black People with poetic unity’s new initiative​

Poetic Unity’s ‘No Cost in Giving’ programme launches 20th March 2023 and will provide young Black/Black mixed people aged 12-30 years old the opportunity to enjoy the cultural highlights of London. With the economic downturn and effects of the pandemic, young Black people have been cut off from experiencing London’s best events.

Free/ discounted tickets will be offered first to members on our exclusive No Cost in Giving mailing list. To sign up to this list email your name, age and contact number with the title ‘No Cost in Giving’ to info@poeticunity.org.uk

Please note these tickets are only for young Black/Black mixed people aged between 12-30 years old. Young people under 18 years old need to be accompanied by an adult on any visit and organisations working with young Black people can also sign up to our mailing list. 

V&A Performance Festival 2023

22nd – 30th April 2023

@V_and_A / #VAPerformanceFestival

The theme for the V&A Performance Festival 2023 is Musicals – inspired by current free display Re:Imagining Musicals in the Theatre and Performance Galleries. Running between the 22nd – 30th of April, the entire V&A will become a stage for contemporary practitioners to animate galleries and atmospheric spaces around the museum for diverse audiences. The wide range of over 50 events encompassing live performances, screenings, talks, tours, demonstrations, and workshops will celebrate, explore and deconstruct musical theatre, revealing the craft behind songs and stories alike.

Highlights of the festival’s weekend programme include performances by Rifco Theatre CompanyHighRise Entertainment and Millennium Performing Arts, a musical drag performance, panel discussions with leading theatre practitioners director Katie Mitchell and actor Mei Mac on sustainability and representation in the theatre, workshops led by the teams of Disney’s Frozen the Musical and the global hit SIX the Musical, an afternoon event dedicated to the work of Stephen Sondheim with masterclass led by Jenna Russell, and  installations commissioned especially for UK Festival of Performance Design and Prague Quadrennial.

During the week, there will be special curator tours across the collections, screenings of musicals from the National Video Archive of Performance, an evening talk with star of stage and screen Bonnie Langford, and a special ‘Sounding Futures’ Friday Late

celebrating the capacity of songs to sound new worlds.

Events free and drop in unless otherwise stated. Learn more via the online programme.

Outside QMUL

Free Podcasting Workshops with Spotify – Deadline today 5 April

Starting in April, we’re hosting workshops around the world for podcast creators to connect, create, and learn from the @SpotifyUK team.

Application deadline extended until the 5th April 2023. Explore the first round of workshops and apply here: http://spotifystudios.com/spotify-labs

Are you interested in learning Python, one of the most popular programming languages in the world? Do you want to learn from experienced students at one of the top universities in the UK? If so, we have great news for you!

We are excited to offer you a 6-week beginners course in Python programming taught by students at the University of Sheffield. This course is designed for people with little or no experience in coding. You will learn the basics of Python, including variables, data types, conditional statements, loops, functions, and object-oriented programming.

Our course is taught by experienced students who are passionate about teaching and helping beginners learn to code. You will receive interactive lessons and hands-on exercises to help you learn and retain the material. By the end of the course, you will have a solid foundation in Python and be ready to take on more advanced projects.

You will have access to top-quality resources and support throughout the course. Furthermore we will ensure the course is fully flexible with exams and summer approaching.

To sign up please register your interest on our website:

https://www.enactussheffield.org/codecreators

Peckham Fringe 2023

Ribbon Around a Bomb
12 May, 7:30pm  

A creative art history workshop aimed at sharing autistic joy and the incredible life and art of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. 

I  LOVE ACTING, BUT F*** THIS INDUSTRY  
5 – 6 May & 31 May, 7.30pm  A global pandemic that flipped an industry on its head. 3 close friends battling the romance between craft and the disheartening acting industry that pays for it.

View the full programme and book

LAST MINUTE TICKETS TO SEE LOLA + FREE POPCORN

  Our preview screening of LOLA is happening at Genesis Cinema tomorrow!

Set in 1941, LOLA follows two music-loving sisters, Thomasina (Emma Appleton, Everything I Know About Love) and Martha (Stefanie Martini, Prime Suspect 1973), who build a machine that can intercept broadcasts from the future. 

Shot on 16mm and 35mm film stock, LOLA is an inventive found-footage sci-fi that explores the making (and remaking) of history and its consequences.

With a limited cinema run, don’t miss your chance to see this time-travelling thriller on the big screen!   £5 TICKETS (INC. FREE POPCORN)    

This is not your normal cinema trip.
This is MASSIVE.  

Free event at SOAS: Hidden Histories: Celebrating through Masquerade – 28 April

Book here

Black Britain Unspoken w/ Warner Bros. Discovery


All black filmmakers please apply here: https://lnkd.in/dsShq2-d to have a new commissioned film published on discovery+

Free Online Course: Getting into the screen industries

Sign up here

Killing Joy as a Queer Project 

Killing Joy as a Queer Project  “In my recently published The Feminist Killjoy Handbook, I suggest that the feminist killjoy is a queer figure with a queer history. When you reclaim the term feminist killjoy you end up in conversation with other people who, like you, find a potential or promise in that term, how its negativity can be redirected. In this lecture, I explore the queerness of the project of killing joy as a project of redirecting negativity. I develop some of my arguments about ‘the unhappy queer’ from The Promise of Happiness (2010) as well as ‘queer use’ from What’s the Use? On the Uses of Use (2019). In giving the feminist killjoy a queer history, I also show how and why killing joy is a world-making project.” Wednesday 24th of May, 7pm.River Room, Strand Campus.King’s College London.

Sign up here!

Jobs and Opps Closing Soon

Video Production Fellow, True Cost (Summer 2023) – Deadline rolling apply now

Editorial Assistant, Woo (ITV) – Deadline 7 April

Digital Marketing Assistant at Unbound – Deadline 9 April

Lyra McKee Journalism Bursary Scheme 2023 – Deadline 9 April

Editorial Assistant – Manchester International Festival – Deadline 9 April

Penguin Summer Internships x 9 – Deadline 11 April

Events Assistant – London College of Fashion – Deadline 18 April

Google News Intitiative Student Fellowships – Deadline 21 April

Jed Mercurio Mentorship Programme (Scriptwriting) – Deadline 21 April

Government Communication Services Apprentice x 40 Deadline 27 April

Assistant Producer at Tamasha Theatre – Deadline 1 May

Creative Access placements at Sky – Deadline 2 May

Graduate Internship Programme at Commonwealth Foundation – Deadline 2 May

See all Queen Mary jobs

Updated: Further sources of interesting events, opportunities and jobs are…

Apples & Snakes Artists Newsletter | Arts Admin E-Digest | ArtsJobs | BBC Academy | Creative Access (Jobs) | Creative Lives in Progress | ERIC – Career + Opportunities App | Film London | IlikeNetworking | JournoResources | Lectures.London | MediaBeans (media jobs) | QMUL Careers | Presspad | Run the Check | ScreenSkills | Society of Young Publishers | Startup Jobs | Tower Hamlets Arts | Write at Home (freelance writing opps)